The New Hacking Tool: `Destroy Obamacare'

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Nov. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Dan Holden, security director at Arbor Networks, discusses the new hacking tool that targets Healthcare.gov with Julie Hyman and Adam Johnson on Bloomberg Television's "Street Smart." (Source: Bloomberg)

Healthcare.gov with a program like this.

The tool is designed to flood the website with multiple requests.

You think about an automated tool that would act as though many people are going to decide at the same time.

It is decide to flood the site and make it unavailable for people to get access to.

Do you have any indications that people are using it?

Is this already a problem?

No, i don't think it is a problem yet.

It is a rather simplistic tool.

We see these quite often.

It is commonplace to see these throughout the world during any kind of political type of event.

In this case, pretty simplistic.

Not a lot of efficacy.

It is ending with commentary on civil disobedience.

One would think that this kind of thing, i don't know if it is legal or not legal if the express purpose of it is to shut down healthcare.gov.

As a government trying to shut them down?

I think the real risk is that this was a message of what is possible.

We see these sorts of threats popped up all over the world, certainly during elections when other countries are perhaps debating or arguing over pieces of land or whatever the case might be.

It is a sign of things to come.

It is difficult to attack a site that is already unavailable due to launching problems.

The real question will be as the site does get into a better position as it does potentially get more use and as attackers are able to scan it, look at it, potentially find weaknesses in it, the question is what is possible.

As of right now, i don't think any of the issues of that are related to any kind of denial of service attack.

Last month, the department of justice effectively indicted 13 men from anonymous on what they were trying to do to take down websites.

Is there any chance that this happens as well?

It is certainly not uncommon for any website, public or private to get outside help to look for weaknesses.

There are actually lots of bounty programs available for vendors out there that do ask for help.

There is penetration testers throughout the world and many vendors companies available to do that sort of thing.

The issue here is that most federal sites are generally displaying or providing information.

In this case you have a site

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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