The Domain Name Battle for 35 Percent of the World

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July 29 (Bloomberg) -- GoDaddy.com Senior Director, Icann Policy & Planning James Bladel discusses Icann's domain expansion and overhaul plans. He speaks with Emily Chang on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

First of all, .amazon was rejected after protests from latin american countries because of the amazon.

What do you make of this rejection?

Is this a big blow for amazon?

It is interesting and it came as a surprise because the u.s. government, prior to the meeting where this occurred, announced they were going to stay neutral and that clear the path for this other governments to raise their objections.

It is not final as i understand it.

How do you expect it to play out?

Correct, ultimately the ican board of directors will make a decision on these requests.

The recommendations of governments are typically going to be followed.

I think it would be a long shot of the board of directors went against his recommendation and it would probably create a new controversy.

The odds are is that they will go along with this and i will block that application.

There are many other domain names up for grabs.

Big companies are vying for some, and names.

What are the issues that icann weighs when it decides whether they will approve a name and to to give it to?

There are a number of factors.

Each applicant has to demonstrate that they have the technical and financial acumen to operate a domain name registry.

Once that evaluation is clear, other checks come into play like everyone claims to represent a bandar a community, or representing a geographic name, that they have the sponsorship of those organizations behind them.

Once all of those things are through, the process moves on to the board of directors or they can prove that for contract and that moves into a testing and launch phase.

What do you see happening to a domain name like .book that amazon.com likes but publishers have complained about.

? are still discussions going on between the icann board of directors and the governments that have raised this.

They're calling this a category two registry.

We are expecting some additional announcement on that at this last meeting in south africa.

This seems like everything got hung up on the . amazon issue.

It is much as amazon that is applying for these strings.

Other companies are applying and they have different ideas of how the strength like .bvook book be operated.

13 different companies have applied for .app.

Many companies out there could use that domain.

When you have so much competition, what happens?

Does nobody get it in the end?

Eventually, someone will get it but it is a question of who and when.

They all have different ideas on how these domain name registries of the opera and you can register these extensions and what markets they will serve.

Godaddy is excited because we want to carry them all and give our customers the widest variety.

That was my next question.

How do you want this to play out?

We want to see as many of these top-level domains entering the market as soon as possible so that we can start to offer them for our customers.

We work closely with icann and the registries to make sure we are marketing them to folks who may need these top-level domains but maybe aren't aware they are coming out or aware of this program.

That is what we are looking forward to in the next few months.

Are there any no-brainers in terms of domain names and what are they?

In terms of these top level -- right.

There are a few that are not contested.

There is an arabic strength that is launching cent.

If there is no con tending applications, there is no objections and no concerns from governments, these things can proceed into the contract and and launch phase.

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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