Making Clean Energy From Dirty Pig Droppings

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June 12 (Bloomberg) -- Bloomberg Television's “Money Clip” Host Adam Johnson looks at a plan to make clean energy from pig waste. (Source: Bloomberg)

In order to accomplish that, we know we need to have policies that create frameworks that provide states flexibility to make all of that happen.

Duke university in north carolina is trying to make things happen with plagues.

Here is frank says no with " planet forward" in partnership with george washington university.

How about a side of bacon with that clean energy?

Consider this -- a new approach to turn waste into usable methane gas.

Like that is what we set out to do, evaluate what would be the best farms to put systems like this on, what be a most productive way to make biogas.

The pilot project comes from duke university research with funding from heavy hitters, google and duke energy, interested in offsets from renewable energy credits.

North carolina energy centers require a portion comes from swine waste and all of that could pack a punch.

The epa says many were management is responsible for 13% of greenhouse gas emissions.

You could reduce the cost of electricity production by as much as half.

And affordable model, a digestive.

It separates the waste in two streams.

The bacteria creates a biogas and we convey the biogas to hear to dry it, filter it, and generate electricity.

The liquid goes into a basin where it is her five and repurpose -- less waste and more water for irrigation.

The technology works, and they say it is even outperforming their goals, but there are hurdles to jump.

To bring it to scale cost a lot of money and we have to do hard thinking about where that is going to come from so that we can capitalize.

It would be a pork barrel

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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