Is In Flight WiFi a Winner?

REPLAY VIDEO
Your next video will start in
Pause

Recommended Videos

  • Info

  • Comments

  • VIDEO TEXT

Oct. 31 (Bloomberg) -- Jon Erlichman reports on the FAA's decision to allow the use of some devices on flights. he speaks on Bloomberg Television’s "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Bet the wireless companies are pretty excited about this.

It is early days, but everybody is positioning themselves.

Even amazon tom a people can do some shopping on their flight.

A spokesman for amazon saying it's about time.

There was more meaty -- more immediate stock market reaction today.

The companies providing wi-fi actions, gogo is probably the dominant name in that category.

Shares were up five percent.

A couple of wrinkles, though.

This is a company that claims to have 82% of the in-flight wi-fi market in north america.

You mentioned that key hurdle of 10,000 feet.

It is not a service that is meant to be available at less than 10,000 feet.

The ceo was interviewed today and was a little vague on whether they would change course on that.

Another player is the southwest wi-fi provider and suggested they may be able to act a few changes.

Those companies saw their stock moving on this news today.

A less obvious winner from this is qualcomm, which one preliminary regulatory clearance in may for an air to ground broadband service.

This is an important wireless story.

If you think about qualcomm, a company that pushed forward on wireless technology, it has had connections to this whole story of using devices in the plane for years.

Famously took reporters on a flight years ago just to prove whether or not you could actually be using your cell phone on a flight, obviously an faa approved flight for the media to attend on.

If you look at the companies that have been trying to push wireless technology, wall, has benefited from this massive move

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

Advertisement

BTV Channel Finder

Channel_finder_loader

ZIP is required for U.S. locations

Bloomberg Television in   change