I Prefer IPO Over Merger: SAIF Partners' Yan

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Oct. 4 (Bloomberg) -- Andrew Yan, managing partner at SAIF Parnters, discusses his venture capital investment strategy with Deirdre Bolton on Bloomberg Television's "Money Moves." (Source: Bloomberg)

We are pretty much new to everything.

We all -- we are an all-purpose fund.

Tech, media, telecoms.

It in health care, education, consumer goods, logistics, so on and so forth.

I know you're making 100% of your investments in china and in india and in other parts of asia.

What do you see as the most compelling?

You gave me a few sectors there, but the most compelling ideas you are seeing in the specific fields?

We are especially focused on the two largest come at the emergency -- largest, the emerging economy.

We have been doing that since our inception in 2001. i think that is where we are located.

We have a local business where we have our team.

We know every aspect of the society.

What has been the biggest surprise to you about adjusting them as you have done for decades in china and india, what is the biggest surprise about the tech environment?

Generally speaking, the growth rate.

It is just so fast?

The sheer size of the market.

For example, we invested in a water purification company in 2010. at the time the company almost sought bankruptcy because there was a fight between shareholders.

The company did not do well.

The company has a growth rate of 20% per month.

Last year it has made over $200 million.

We are in the stage of ipo.

It is hard to find in a smaller economy -- but you cannot find it in china or india.

That is the beauty of the large size of the car -- of the emerging economy.

You mention the ipo, you mention hong kong, how do you -- how receptive do you find the hong kong stock exchange?

The reason i ask is because we have been covering alley, -- covering alley bubba.

They would like to control the board, and that seems to put in a lot of conflict.

I think they have their own right.

You have trade the shareholders -- treat the shareholders fairly and equally.

In the united states you have different share classes.

You have different ways of control.

Just another way to do it.

There is another way to do it.

Hong kong needs to assess the stock exchange.

I need to assess the situation.

Economy grows, the society develops coming have to choose what is in the best interest of the hong kong people.

I understand why they have concerns.

If you give a special deal to alibaba, what about -- they only have minority shares.

He also wants to have control.

It has become a more general

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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