Hulu's Move Into Original Programming

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Nov. 11 (Bloomberg) -- Charlotte Koh, head of originals at Hulu, discusses Hulu's move into original programming with Jon Erlichman on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

So, how did this show come to hulu?

The show came about as a result of our relationship with the bbc.

Week of been extremely successful in licensing their shows and we decided on certain shows we wanted to get involved in an earlier stage.

When they invited us to co-produce the show with them, we were really, really enthusiastic about the opportunity.

It is a fun, interesting series.

You've done a lot of green lighting over the last couple of years of different types of shows.

I mean, i think of "a day in the life," "the awesomes." when you're picking a show, what is it that you're looking for?

I think the most important thing we're looking for is a distinct creative voice.

So all those shows you just mentioned and then "the wrong mans" included, i think they're all trying to do something new in the television space that's smart and that also crosses different genres.

So we're really looking for that show that's going to have a distinctive flavor and personality, that's going to thrive in an on-demand service.

Do you feel like comedy is really where hulu feels, you know, feels that there's definitely a comedy theme with hulu original shows.

I would say it's still early in our evolution and we have focused on comedy in these first couple of years because they're a manageable scope and scale of production.

I definitely think our missions going forward will be to broaden the scope into hour-dramas and other types of programming so we've been very lucky with comedy from other con tebt partners as well and it proves that that genre on the service, but i'd say the ambition going forward is definitely to do more comedies and also more of other genres.

Interesting.

There was a headline a few months ago about hulu possibly rolling up in the neighborhood of 40 originals over a two-year stretch.

Does that make you say, we have a lorge of originals to find or is it the opposite, that you've got a lot of good shows and it can be hard to find a home for them?

Well, i think when we talk about originals broadly, that umbrella includes shows that we license as well as the ones that we do in-house.

And instead of uh-oh i think we're very enthusiastic about the possibility of bringing a greater variety of television to our audience and into growing that audience by offering them more shows.

The ambition there too is also to figure out what can we do to build the best personality possible for hulu overall and service our audiences with very tailored content that feels really unique and feels like a destination for them.

So i do think that it's an ambitious goal but it's also one that is achievable and really energizes the company overall.

And quickly before we go, hulu-plus subscribers get all six episodes of "the wrong mans" right away.

We talk about binge viewing.

Is the goal to make, you know, as many originals as possible available for the binge viewing folks or actually does it really depend on the series?

Thus far we've customized the release pattern with the show.

"the wrong mans" is uniquely optimized to be watched in a bingeble way because the plotting is heavily serialized.

They wanted to bring the sophisticated story telling of a "24" into a comedy genre.

So i think it really is great to have all six up on the service today because it's the kind of story too where you fall in love with the characters and you won't want to stop watching.

At this point it's a title-by-title thing and i think we try to do it in a way that optimizes for each show.

We'll keep watching.

Thanks for your time.

The head of development for hulu

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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