How Serious Is Adobe's Customer Data Breach?

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Oct. 4 (Bloomberg) -- Adobe Systems said hackers broke into its networks and stole personal data on 2.9 million customers and source code for popular products including Acrobat and ColdFusion. Jordan Robertson reports on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Attack.

What happened?

Unfortunately for adobe, it is join the long list of companies that have found its own network hashed -- hacked.

2.9 million customer records.

Potentially more troublesome for adobe is source code, for some of its biggest products, was also stolen.

The reason is more important for adobe is credit card numbers, while embarrassing for the company, for consumers it is pretty simple to place a fraud alert on your account, consult -- cancel the credit card.

The source code for adobe products -- we are talking about billions of dollars of intellectual property potentially stolen.

Adobe has not quantified that for us, but that's essentially the bigger issue here.

To whom would that source code be valuable?

Hackers.

If you have the source code for a product, you can do one of two things.

You can clone the product, which is useful for pirates, but mostly for hackers if you have the source code, you can look for vulnerabilities that adobe has not fixed yet and you can send out a fake acrobat file or if a greater file.

-- reader file.

If you planted malicious code in their -- there, you can attack people without doing much of anything at all.

If hackers find those bugs in adobe software, there could be powerful attacks from them.

It seems that hackers are tough to thwart, but you would think they would have their source code among the most protected assets.

You would.

It reminds me of an attack that happened to semen tech --

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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