How Will NLRB Ruling Impact College Sports?

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March 28 (Bloomberg) -- Alejandra Cancino, a writer for the Chicago Tribune, and Bloomberg's Eban Novy-Williams discuss the college pay for play debate with Trish Regan on Bloomberg Television's "Street Smart." (Source: Bloomberg)

About players being taken advantage of especially at the division i level.

A kind of seems like a no-brainer that they would look to unionization but this is the first time it has actually come forward in a big way.

What are the next steps?

Northwestern says they will appeal the decision.

They said they have until april 9 to file a petition for review.

Then the union will probably file another document that a sickly says we don't agree with the addition for review and we think that they had the right ruling and that will go to the nlrb in washington where northwestern will appeal and then it will be up to the nlrb in washington to decide whether or not to uphold the decision of the nlrb director in chicago.

With the case that could be made that this is an antitrust violation?

That's an interesting question but i think it's too early to get to that level.

Right now, it's a decision for the original director.

Northwestern will appeal and we will know more about the implications after the nlrb makes their ruling in washington.

That's what is going on and they're talking about the ncaa effectively being a cartel.

They are sort of the only game in town and you could say that they brainwash kids into thinking you need to go to division i and you will be so lucky to get this scholarship.

By the way, a scholarship whose value is very debatable.

It depends on the university and it may depend on how much access you are given to getting the education itself.

For sure and that is what the member organizations always come back to.

The scholarship is worth so much and the opportunity to play college sports, the exposure that gets you and your movement to the next level and that is what the northwestern football players are trying to fight.

You mentioned the antitrust suit . there was one filed about a month ago that the ncaa is fighting and the big legacy of what the northwestern football players are doing regardless of whether or not the national labor relations board agrees is that it is just another public issue that more people are reading about and it is shifting public perception towards the idea that drastic change needs to be done.

A lot of people get mad.

They say they should be lucky they are getting this education, but you look at this, the ncaa basketball, march madness tournament for example and what you see is that the television revenue that is collect it off of just march madness alone tops that of any postseason professional sport including the nfl.

It's not amateur in the sense that there's big money to play and a lot of people are getting paid.

It's really interesting.

One of the things i have been covering in this topic is that everyone has an opinion.

It's interesting because a lot of labor experts were debating yesterday about what this really means going forward.

The chairman of the big east was saying they're going have to pay taxes.

So what?

That's going to be really hard.

There was a study done by drexel sports management and i think we have some charts that show on average, a basketball player should be making in the vicinity of $900,000 with the top player being at louisville for $1.6 million and the lowest market value being indiana four 690000 and that is her year.

That's a whole lot more than a $50,000 education they are giving you.

It's easy to make that statistic with basketball because it is so small.

There are so many questions that need to be answered.

How much you pay the star, the johnny manziel versus the freshman.

I know we only have another minute here but let's theorize for a second.

What if you said, here is the amount of money we will give to division i. you have collected all this money from cbs.

Here are the amounts we will give to all of you and maybe you divided up equally among division i schools and then maybe you could do that in a range.

You pay a little bit more for the better player, the starting player as opposed to someone who will be benched but you give them a stipend.

You don't have to give them a ton of money but you give them something because they are still working.

Do you pay women's gymnastics?

It does not bring in money.

You go with the revenue-producing sports, the ones bringing in the money are the players it would get paid.

Like under that system you're taking away money from the gymnastics program.

The basketball team and the football team make money and a lot of it, not a lot, but it gets siphoned off to pay for the programs that don't make money.

The women's gymnastics coaches not making anything near what the men's basketball coach.

You are right, nowhere close.

I spoke to the men's coach at iowa and he says there's not a gymnastics coach in the country does not go to sleep worrying about if the football team stops making money.

Why should they subsidize?

Why can you not put market value onto this?

It happens from ncaa, the cbs, the actual coaches.

There are programs that just don't make money and you want to have more than just a basketball and foot all team.

The profit that those programs are making go back to the players and its last money for the athletic department as a whole to kick around and pay for the other programs.

Maybe it comes down to not paying the coaches of millions and millions of dollars and maybe some of that money could go to gymnastics.

They've got to find a way to figure this out because it's putting a lot of really talented athletes in a bad spot.

It's not fair.

It's just not fair.

Thank you very much,. coming up, kevin spacey is

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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