Can Building Computers Be as Easy as Legos?

REPLAY VIDEO
Your next video will start in
Pause

Recommended Videos

  • Info

  • Comments

  • VIDEO TEXT

Nov. 27 (Bloomberg) -- Co-Founder of Kano Computing Alex Klein discusses the company's DIY computer building kit with Jon Erlichman on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Cofounder alex klein.

Give us the back story on why you decided to do this.

Sure.

It would back to a conversation that i had with my seven-year- old cousin.

We were playing with a little open source lynn explored -- lennox board.

I hoped he would share my enthusiasm, but to him it was just confusing.

He said alice, make this as simple and fun as legos.

That was the challenge.

That is what started it off, at least for me, and then we kind of assembled the team, a group of amazing people.

From six different countries around the world.

They created the first computer that anybody can make.

We are on kick starter right now.

For those people who go out and get one of these and do make it, what can they do with a? you have the capacity with the kano computer that you would have with your smart phone or even a pc.

You can stream high-definition video, you can play games, you can talk to your friends on the internet, but importantly, all of these function audis -- you have the ability to change them into warp them yourself, kind of like neo in the "matrix." you control these rules and you get to dive in and start coding that is not so boring.

It feels more like play.

It feels like jumping into something that is familiar, swimming around, and noticing you have new powers, powers that you did not expect.

You talked about using the ladle model, and having a conversation with a young person about going ahead with something like this.

I mean, who is this for?

Or i should say, who are the youngest people that could potentially be using this computer?

Are you talking about six-year- old and seven-year-olds?

We have spent the last year working on it, we talked to hundreds of kids, artists, teachers, hackers, the youngest person to make the kano computer was a fix in fact but the oldest was 81. i think there really is a latent hunger among most of us.

We live in an incredible time.

We have these magic devices in our pockets that can access all conceivable human information and connect this to any human we have ever met, but at the same time, you know, they are essentially missed upon, we have no way of diving below the surface.

The only people who do are those who are creating the devices themselves.

In a world suffused with computing, suffused with connectivity, we wanted to give you a way to take back control, to dive into the world below the angry birds and actually start to play around and express yourself in a new waiter honestly, we think it is for everyone to read -- in a new way.

Honestly, we think it is for everyone.

You reached your kick starter goal and something like 18 hours.

Now comes the question of can you deliver these products to all of the people who are interested in getting them?

Give us a quick comment on that.

We can definitely deliver.

We are going to be shipping the kits by june 2014, and even before then, there will be a lot of goodies.

You will be making the game pong on the web, you will be making music with our coding language.

There are a ton of ways whether you are a teacher or a kid to get involved and start making stuff right away.

We do not have to live in an off the shelf way.

The off the shelf world has given off off the shelf mind.

It is time for us to take back that control.

If the kick starter is any indicator, it seems like a lot of people want to join in and start playing around with technology in new ways, creating it not just consuming it.

Cool story, alex, thank you for the time.

Alex klein, the cofounder of kano joining us from london.

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

Advertisement

BTV Channel Finder

Channel_finder_loader

ZIP is required for U.S. locations

Bloomberg Television in   change