This Is the World's Largest Solar Thermal Plant

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Feb. 13 (Bloomberg) -- NRG Solar CEO Tom Doyle and GW Solar Institute Director Amit Ronen discuss the future for solar power on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Heating up in california solar thermle.

An hour outside of las vegas, this is now the world's largest solar thermle plant.

It uses the bright hot desert sun to make steam.

It comes down to this turbine that drives the generator to make electricity.

Mirrors follow an algorithm to follow the sun throughout the day.

We have all those different parts and pieces that make up a typical power plant.

We just use the sun's energy to drive it.

It's fully online and can power more than 140,000 homes in california.

C.e.o. tom doyle says using the sun's energy instead of coal is like taking 72,000 polluting cars off the road.

This is an opportunity to prove a technology and use it nationally and internationally to drive down green house gases.

Doyle says the desert's landscape is a perfect location but there aren't many places like this in the u.s. so he's eying other spots around the world.

Markets like saud day rabe i can't is an excellent market for this type of technology.

At more than $2 billion, this collaboration is a serious investment backed by google and the department of energy.

It's more expensive than coal and doesn't generate power when the sun doesn't shine.

But it's designed to deliver energy when it's needed most.

The highest point of the day is when this plant is performing the best.

How efficient is it?

They are facing competition.

The golden state is getting a big boost from big solar and just maybe moving the planet forward.

If you have an idea you'd like to submit, visit

This text has been automatically generated. It may not be 100% accurate.

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