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This is a Difficult Time for FIFA: di Gregorio

U.S. prosecutors have charged at least 10 international soccer officials in an investigation of corruption, including vote rigging in the selection of host countries for World Cup tournaments, according to a person familiar with the matter. Walter di Gregorio, director of information and public affairs at FIFA, says FIFA’s reputation has suffered.

Why Finance Is Too Much of a Good Thing

In today's "Morning Must Read," Bloomberg’s Tom Keene recaps the op-ed pieces and analyst notes providing insight behind today's headlines on "Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)

FIFA Probe Huge, Disruptive Event for Soccer: Bershidsky

Bloomberg View Columnist Leonid Bershidsky discusses corruption allegations brought against FIFA by the United States. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Bershidsky is a Bloomberg View columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.) (Source: Bloomberg)

Equity Market Celebrating Virtues of QE: Jason Trennert

Jason Trennert, chief investment strategist at Strategas Partners, and author of “My Side of the Street,” discusses his faith in the equity market, the impact of quantitative easing and the perception of bull and bear markets to modern-day investors. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)

FIFA Raided in World Cup Probe: The Full Presser

Swiss investigators have seized data from soccer governing body FIFA’s headquarters as part of a criminal probe into the controversial 2010 vote that delivered the next two World Cups to Russia and Qatar. Walter di Gregorio, director of information and public affairs at FIFA, gives a statement and answers questions at a press conference in Zurich.

FIFA Vote to Go Ahead With Russia, Qatar Cups Still On

The election for president of FIFA, soccer's ruling body, will go ahead as planned, as will plans for the World Cup in Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022, according to Walter de Gregorio, FIFA's director of communications. He spoke at a news conference in Zurich following the arrest of six people, as FIFA leaders gathered to consider the re-election of embattled president Joseph "Sepp" Blatter. (Excerpts. Source: APTN)

Consequence of a Greek Exit Is Euro Negative: Adam Cole

Adam Cole, head of global FX strategy at RBC, talks with Francine Lacqua about the potential currency impact of a Greek exit and the threat of contagion to other European nations. He speaks on “The Pulse.” (Source: Bloomberg)

FIFA: Russia, Qatar Will Hold ’18, ’22 World Cups

Walter di Gregorio, director of information and public affairs at FIFA, speaks at a press conference in Zurich about corruption allegations brought against the sport’s governing body and addresses the 2018 and 2022 games in Russia and Qatar. (Source: Bloomberg)

Luxury

For Sale: Bel Air Home to Be Listed for Record $500M

One of the biggest homes in U.S. history is rising on a Los Angeles hilltop, and the developer hopes to sell it for a record $500 million. Bloomberg's Betty Liu and Pimm Fox have more on "Bloomberg Markets." (Source: Bloomberg)

Luxury Watches: The Outside Matters More Now

Jean-Mark Jacot, chief executive officer at Parmigiani Fluerier, speaks with Stephen Pulvirent about the importance of design, the brand’s partnership with Bugatti and why the company is not pursing an entry into the smart watch industry. He speaks on “Market Makers.” (Source: Bloomberg)

How Hermes Ties Together a Luxury Brand Legacy

Robert Chavez, president and chief executive officer at Hermes, talks about the legacy of quality at Hermes and how the company is expanding the brand. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)

China Stock Boom Drives Luxury Car Demand

There are signs that confidence is returning to the high-end consumer market in China with sales of super-luxury cars starting to pick up after a slump in 2014. Bloomberg’s Rosalind Chin reports on “First Up.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Bloomberg Surveillance

Why Finance Is Too Much of a Good Thing

In today's "Morning Must Read," Bloomberg’s Tom Keene recaps the op-ed pieces and analyst notes providing insight behind today's headlines on "Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)

FIFA Probe Huge, Disruptive Event for Soccer: Bershidsky

Bloomberg View Columnist Leonid Bershidsky discusses corruption allegations brought against FIFA by the United States. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Bershidsky is a Bloomberg View columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.) (Source: Bloomberg)

Equity Market Celebrating Virtues of QE: Jason Trennert

Jason Trennert, chief investment strategist at Strategas Partners, and author of “My Side of the Street,” discusses his faith in the equity market, the impact of quantitative easing and the perception of bull and bear markets to modern-day investors. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” (Source: Bloomberg)

U.S. Long-Term Projected Debt Down Considerably: Orszag

Citigroup Vice Chairman and Bloomberg View Columnist Peter Orszag discusses the U.S. budget and projected deficit. He speaks on “Bloomberg Surveillance.” His opinions are his own. (Correct, Orszag is also a Bloomberg View Columnist) (Source: Bloomberg)

Bloomberg West

Jony Ive's New Role at Apple: Bloomberg West (05/26)

Full episode of "Bloomberg West." Guests: JMP Securities' Alex Gauna, Cibo's Alder Yarrow, Frog Design's Cobie Everdell, Bloomberg contributing editor David Kirkpatrick, and iON Cameras CEO Giovanni Tomaselli and President James Harrison. (Source: Bloomberg)

Amazon's German Tax Bill Is About to Get Bigger

Today’s "BWest Byte" is $16 million, for how much Amazon's German unit reportedly paid in 2014 taxes off of $11.9 billion in German sales. Bloomberg's Emily Chang reports on "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Game of (Cable) Thrones: Malone Tries to Reclaim Top Spot

The $55 billion bid by John Malone’s Charter Communications for Time Warner Cable shows the 74-year-old billionaire remains eager to grab a leading role in the industry consolidation taking place on both sides of the Atlantic. Bloomberg's Emily Chang has more on "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Are iON's Cameras a Threat to GoPro?

Giovanni Tomaselli, CEO of iON Cameras, and James Harrison, president, explain how the company plans to take on GoPro. They speak with Bloomberg's Emily Chang on "Bloomberg West." (Source: Bloomberg)

Billionaires

The Billionaire Behind Charter's Bid for Time Warner

Charter Communications recently announced it will buy Time Warner Cable for $55 billion. The merger will create the second-largest cable company in the U.S., with 17 million subscribers compared with Comcast’s 22 million. The big winner in this deal: John Malone, controlling shareholder of Charter and the most important media mogul you’ve never heard of. Bloomberg Businessweek’s Sam Grobart reports. (Source: Bloomberg)

Goldin Chairman Made, and Lost, Billions

The Chinese tycoon who lost billions when his companies plunged in Hong Kong says he simply doesn’t care. Goldin Chairman Pan Sutong has seen shares soar and plunge over the last six months. Bloomberg’s Frederik Balfour reports on “Trending Business.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Russia’s Richest Man Keeps Getting Richer

Bloomberg’s Ryan Chilcote recaps his interview with Russia’s richest man, Vladimir Potanin, chief executive officer of Norilsk Nickle, who spoke about the impact of sanctions against Russia and his relationship with President Vladimir Putin. He speaks on “Market Makers.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Why China Holds the Key to the Nickel Market

In an exclusive interview, Norilsk Nickel CEO Vladimir Potanin, Russia’s richest man, discusses the nickel market with Bloomberg’s Ryan Chilcote on “Countdown.” (Source: Bloomberg)

With All Due Respect

With All Due Respect (05/26/15)

Mark Halperin and John Heilemann are joined by Ali Rezaian, brother of Washington Post journalist Jason Rezaian, on “With All Due Respect.”

Do Iowa Republican Voters Want a Conservative?

In this Bloomberg Politics/Purple Strategies Iowa focus group video, Republican voters discuss the 2016 GOP field, what type of experience they’re looking for in a candidate and the future of conservatism.