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July 01, 2015 1:12 PM ET

Aerospace and Defense

Company Overview of National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Company Overview

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a U.S. government agency that researches, develops, conducts, and tests civilian and military aerospace systems, satellites, and space probes for space exploration, research, technology, and peaceful purposes. NASA’s projects and missions include moon landings, the orbiting Skylab space station, the Voyager 2 mission, Chandra X-ray Observatory, and the manned space shuttle Columbia of 1981. National Aeronautics and Space Administration was established in 1958 and is headquartered in Washington, District Of Columbia. It has additional centers and field facilities in Moffett Field, Pasadena, and Edwards, California; Cleveland, Ohio; Green...

300 East Street S.W.

Washington, DC 20546-0001

United States

Founded in 1958

Phone:

202-358-0000

Fax:

202-358-3251

Key Executives for National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Administrator
Age: 68
Chief Financial Officer
Chief Education Officer
Chief Scientist
Deputy Chief of Staff
Compensation as of Fiscal Year 2015.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Key Developments

NASA Announces Board Changes

NASA has announced that Dr. David E. Bowles has been named director of NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia, succeeding Stephen G. Jurczyk who served in that capacity from April 2014. Bowles has been serving as the acting center director since March 2015 when Jurczyk was temporarily assigned to NASA Headquarters as the acting Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate. Jurczyk has since been named associate administrator. Bowles began his NASA career at Langley in 1980 as a research engineer in Langley's Materials Division. In 2004, he was named deputy director and later acting director of the Exploration Systems and Space Operations Technology Directorate. In 2007 Bowles officially became the director of the Exploration and Space Operations Directorate. He served in that role until 2012 when he became associate director, third in command at NASA Langley. Bowles moved to deputy director last year when Jurczyk became director. Joining Bowles in the Langley front office will be Clayton Turner as deputy director and Cathy Mangum as associate director. Both have been acting in those positions. Clayton Turner started his NASA career at Langley in 1990 where he was a Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment (LITE) engineer. Since then Turner has served in various roles with progressively increasing responsibility including assistant branch head, branch head, directorate chief engineer, director of the Engineering Directorate, and center chief engineer. Prior to joining NASA Turner was the Chief Engineer for Dynamic Recording Studio in Rochester, New York.

NASA and German Aerospace Center Partner for Research into Advanced Aircraft

NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) have signed agreements to work together to reduce aircraft noise and advance research into rotorcraft, two projects that extend years of vital cooperation between the two agencies. Under the first agreement, NASA and DLR will research advanced methods for predicting aircraft system noise and establish validation guidelines for comparison. Developing aircraft noise reduction technologies that don't adversely affect the environment and increasing efficiency in the aviation sector are major challenges that need to be solved to enable sustainable growth in air transportation in the face of more stringent environmental regulations. Each agency will run high-fidelity noise predictions on two virtual aircraft configurations a model of an aircraft with overwing turbofans and another with turbofans under the wings. As the basis for noise prediction, scientists will use acoustic measurement data acquired by DLR in previous scientific flights. NASA and DLR will partner under the second agreement to develop a new blade imaging technique that will allow the study of airflow over helicopter blades while in flight. Scientists want to determine at what point the smooth, or laminar, airflow goes turbulent as the blades change pitch within the airstream causing a loss of lift. Blade imaging also can help characterize how and when the rotors cause turbulent airflow during forward flight. NASA and DLR also have collaborated on a range of activities related to human spaceflight, space exploration, Earth science and astrophysics. Past collaborative missions include the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) 747 aircraft and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment [2]Â (GRACE) satellites.

NASA, German Aerospace Center Partner for Research into Advanced Aircraft

NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) have signed agreements to work together to reduce aircraft noise and advance research into rotorcraft, two projects that extend years of vital cooperation between the two agencies. Under the first agreement, NASA and DLR will research advanced methods for predicting aircraft system noise and establish validation guidelines for comparison. Developing aircraft noise reduction technologies that don't adversely affect the environment and increasing efficiency in the aviation sector that need to be solved to enable sustainable growth in air transportation in the face of more stringent environmental regulations. NASA and DLR will partner under the second agreement to develop a new blade imaging technique that will allow the study of airflow over helicopter blades while in flight. Scientists want to determine at what point the smooth, or laminar, airflow goes turbulent as the blades change pitch within the airstream causing a loss of lift. Blade imaging also can help characterize how and when the rotors cause turbulent airflow during forward flight.

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