Hillary Clinton Inks Fundraising Accords With 33 State Parties

If Clinton becomes the nominee, she'll benefit from the money she raises for state parties.

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Democratic vice presidential candidate U.S. Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) and U.S. Sen. Hillary Clinton (D-NY) smile at a rally in support of Democratic presidential nomineee U.S. Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL)October 12, 2008 in Scranton, Pennsylvania.

Photo by Jeff Fusco/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign has signed joint fundraising agreements with 33 state Democratic parties, according to a Wednesday filing with the Federal Elections Commission.

The Clinton campaign now has deals in place with the Democratic parties in Florida, Nevada, Ohio, South Carolina, and Texas, among other states and Puerto Rico, to create "victory funds." Contributions to those funds will be divided between the respective state parties and Clinton's primary campaign war chest. 

Clinton has stressed that she wants her campaign and candidacy to boost other Democrats all the way down the ticket. Helping channel donors' support for her into state parties is one way to leverage her fundraising power on behalf of other candidates—and to link the success of other Democrats to her own.

The Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee announced a fundraising agreement in late August, making it possible for donors to give to her campaign and to the party's general election fund with one check. Clinton would only benefit from the money if she becomes the Democratic nominee.

The New York Times reported last month on the agreements reached between the Clinton campaign and state parties in New Hampshire, Virginia, Wisconsin, and Mississippi. The state parties' agreements with Clinton do not preclude them from establishing similar arrangements with other Democratic candidates.

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