Carl Icahn Says He'll Never Be Trump's Treasury Secretary

The billionaire investor said he doesn't "get up early enough in the morning to" be Trump's treasury secretary, but that we should listen the real estate mogul just the same.

Key Speakers At The Leveraged Finance Fights Melanoma Event

Billionaire activist investor Carl Icahn speaks with attendees during the Leveraged Finance Fights Melanoma charity event in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, May 19, 2015. Lyft Inc. is worth more than its recent $2 billion valuation, based on the $50 billion value of larger car-hailing rival Uber Technologies Inc., Icahn said, after he led a fundraising round at Lyft last week.

Victor J. Blue/Bloomberg *** Local Caption *** Carl Icahn

Billionaire Carl Icahn doesn't want to be Treasury Secretary in the Trump Administration, but he thinks the Donald is "completely correct" in his concern about interest rates.

"I was extremely surprised to learn that Donald was running for President and even more surprised that he stated he would make me Secretary of Treasury," the activist investor wrote in a statement he linked to on his verified Twitter account. "I am flattered but do not get up early enough in the morning to accept this opportunity."

He added, though, that he thinks the real estate mogul, who is seeking the Republican nomination for president, is right to worry that the U.S. has "a big fat bubble coming up" because of low interest rates.

"I personally believe we are sailing in dangerous unchartered waters," wrote the former corporate raider, who is worth approximately $22 billion and is the 33rd richest person in the world, according to Bloomberg. "I can only hope we get to shore safely. Never in the history of the Federal Reserve have interest rates been artificially held down for so long at the extremely low rates existing today. I applaud Donald for speaking out on this issue — more people should."

Trump said Thursday he might name his "friend Carl Icahn" treasury secretary of he should find himself in the White House. He also suggested former GE CEO Jack Welch and KKR co-founder Henry Kravis could also fill the spot.

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