If Only More Laws Involved Taking Down Nazis

An Associated Press report spurred successful legislation in six weeks. All it took was a few Nazis.

Photograph By: T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images

The House voted unanimously on Tuesday to end Social Security benefits for Nazis. The bill passed six weeks after the Associated Press found that the Justice Department for years had been using the benefits as leverage to convince suspects to leave the country.

Under the bill, the Justice Department and the Social Security Administration are required to give Congress a report in six months on the number of beneficiaries and the number who will lose benefits under the new law.

The joke is that it takes fighting Nazis to bring Democrats and Republicans together, and that’s fairly accurate. Besides passing 420-0, the bill had 48 co-sponsors, 24 Republicans and 24 Democrats. Lawmakers on the left and right condemned the practice, as did the White House. No one was really on the fence about this. The Senate is expected to pass a bill soon.

It’s always nice to see lawmakers work together, and quickly, but bigger issues facing Congress are another story. Even the bill’s co-sponsors admit that most of the damage from the Social Security issue has been done. “They are dying out, but anybody who gets it is too much,” Democratic Representative Carolyn Maloney told CNN, adding, “If we can’t agree on this, my goodness, what can we agree on?”

If Congress is looking for things to agree on, President Barack Obama might suggest Ebola funding. On Tuesday, he visited the National Institutes of Health to remind everyone Ebola still exists, praise scientists' work on developing a vaccine, and ask Congress to pass his $6.2 billion funding request.

“How do you argue with that?” he said. “That is not a partisan issue. That is a basic, common-sense issue that all Americans can agree on.” In that case, maybe he should look into whether Nazis invented Ebola.

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