House Campaign Groups Have $100 Million Left to Burn

The Democrats' fundraising edge could help them to cushion losses.

Updated on
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A Matsumura Engineering Co. employee arranges "Super S" counterfeit 100 U.S. dollar bank for a photograph at the company's headquarters in Tokyo, Japan, on Wednesday, July 9, 2014.

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The two partisan groups overseeing strategy in U.S. House elections have more than $100 million to play with in the homestretch of the Nov. 4 vote.

Democrats led Republicans by $54.5 million to $45.7 million in available cash as September began, though that edge probably won't deliver them the majority in a year in which they might lose seats. The White House's party usually loses ground in Congress in midterm elections.

The Democrats' fundraising edge could help them to cushion losses, though. Republicans control 234 of the 435 House seats.

Here's a look at the August fundraising reports that the two groups filed with the Federal Election Commission over the weekend:

Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC): 

Raised in August: $10.2 million

Available Cash: $54.5 million

Key August donors: James Hormel ($32,400), chairman of Equidex Inc. and a former U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg; Donald Sussman ($32,400), the founder of Paloma Partners LLC; Christina Paxson ($15,000), president of Brown University.

National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC):

Raised in August: $4.4 million

Available Cash: $45.7 million

Key August donors: Speaker John Boehner ($600,000 in campaign funds); Rep. Charles Boustany of Louisiana ($150,000 in campaign funds); Kenny Troutt ($15,000), billionaire telecommunications executive; Patrick McInnis ($5,000), CEO of Fathead.

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