Each month, the eyes of traders, portfolio managers, economists and strategists are transfixed on their screens for the release of Markit’s Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) data, which covers some of the world’s most important economies including China, the Eurozone and U.S. This “snap shot” of market-moving data provides an early glimpse of the economic conditions for that month in each of these economies, and is repeated when Markit subsequently publishes their entire universe of PMIs that includes more than 30 countries and 3,600 separate indexes.

Today, for the first time, this data is available on the Bloomberg Professional service. As a result of signing a distribution agreement with Markit, real-time PMI headline data and three years of historical data are now accessible to all Bloomberg subscribers at PMI <GO>.

Today’s flash releases showed that China’s slowdown is accelerating, which may cause its policy makers to step in with new stimulus measures slowing down the country’s efforts to rebalance its economy away from investment. The French Flash PMI surprised analysts coming in well above expectations while the German release disappointed, indicating that the Eurozone recovery is continuing and the gap between France and Germany may be beginning to close. This new data will make it slightly more difficult for ECB officials to argue for fresh monetary stimulus in the face of very low inflation. In the U.S., data indicated only a modest spring rebound following a bout of bad winter weather across most of the country. The winter slowdown combined with tepid spring growth may threaten growth forecasts. While weaker than anticipated, this data is unlikely to deter the U.S. Federal Reserve from altering its tapering path.

Access to the PMI data complements a library of thousands of economic indicators, which are integrated with Bloomberg’s advanced analytics and real-time news offering. Bloomberg’s Economics Workbench can help make sense of it all: helping investors quickly and easily analyze correlations across economic, industry and market datasets. With the Workbench, clients can perform advanced manipulations and seamlessly export the results to Microsoft Excel or PowerPoint.

Here’s a chart of today’s PMI indicators in the Economics Workbench:

Bloomberg also employs senior economists across the US, UK, Singapore and China, and industry experts to produce real-time analysis and daily Economics Brief newsletters for subscribers. To read the special Bloomberg Brief about using the PMIs to gauge global macroeconomic conditions, click here.

While the integration of PMI data is the latest example of our commitment to offering the most powerful platform for economic analysis, it certainly is not the last. Stay tuned for more.

- Michael McDonough, Bloomberg’s Head of Economics Product and Chief Economist, @M_McDonough