For the past month or so we’ve been beta-testing a new Bloomberg.com homepage. Today, we’re live.

At a glance, you’ll notice some obvious differences.

-   The top of the page now has a panoramic photo/video window that helps dramatize our lead stories and gives our visual folks a chance to show off their chops.

-   There’s a fixed ‘headlines’ box on the top right of the page, tabbed with a ‘non-stop news’ module; the former lets users scan the biggest Bloomberg stories of the day, while the latter allows them to watch stories roll off the virtual presses as they’re published. (Try it: It’s weirdly hypnotic.)

-   Also at the top of the page is a new Market Snapshot section that gives users a global view of the world’s leading indices and how they are moving in relation to each other.

-   We’ve enriched the experience as you scroll down. Browsing the top stories in our various section fronts is much easier; there’s increased touting of individual stories, as well as flashes of humor, serendipity, and a new emphasis on social media.

We think the homepage looks better, but what you see is more than just a few design tweaks. It’s reflective of a new phase at Bloomberg.com. For many years the site has been an automated feed from Bloomberg News. Today marks the beginning of a gradual transition—emphasis on gradual—to a more editorially driven site.

Bloomberg’s a pretty unique news organization. We have more than 2,300 reporters in 72 countries, an HD-television network, and so many people doing smart things with data that our headquarters can sometimes feel like an extension of a top research institution like MIT.

What you’ll see on the site over the next few months is our best work brought to the fore. We’ll embrace the flexibility of the web so that our users get the smartest experience possible in the least amount of time. For example, if video conveys the message better and more richly, you’ll get the video. (And only the part that matters: no 10-minute epics on this site.) We know you’re busy, and in everything from our design choices to our story selection, we want to make it clear that we understand that.

What web users won’t get is everything. Subscribers to the Bloomberg Professional service pay for the advantage they get from instant access to the extensive Bloomberg data, news, and analytics. They’ll continue to get specialized exclusive content in real-time, in addition to the communications, charts, liquidity, functionalities, trade execution services, and the list goes on.

What visitors to Bloomberg.com can expect is our best news across a variety of categories, and a commitment to expanding content coming from the web editorial team. Today we launched Bloomberg View, the new opinion section of Bloomberg News run by David Shipley and Jamie Rubin. Next up is Personal Finance, a Sustainability section, and an enriched Tech section. And there’s plenty more after that.

We hope you enjoy the changes we’ve made. Please remember that Bloomberg.com will continue to grow and evolve. We’ll be sure to keep you posted on future enhancements.

Josh Tyrangiel is the editor for Bloomberg Businessweek and responsible for editorial content on Bloomberg.com and Businessweek.com