Law Schools May Close if 2-Year Program Adopted

Jan. 25 (Bloomberg Law) -- A proposal to allow students to leave law school after two years, take the bar and practice could lead to fewer law schools, according to one of its authors, Professor Samuel Estreicher of New York University School of Law. Under the plan, only students who remain for the traditional third year would actually receive a law degree. Another consequence of the proposal is that some schools might increase tuition to make up for the revenue lost by students taking only two years of classes. But because tuition costs are already so high "I don't think most schools have that ability," he says. "Even the great brand schools will not have the ability to jack up their price much more." But the proposal would also significantly trim student debt levels, making it easier for students to serve low-income clients. "I see this as an access to justice proposal," he said. Professor Estreicher speaks with Bloomberg Law's Lee Pacchia.

Greenspan: Don’t See Speculative Aspects of Recession
56:32 - Alan Greenspan, former Federal Reserve chairman and founder at Greenspan Associates, discusses the prospect of a U.S. recession and where he sees early signs of inflation in the U.S. economy. He speaks with Bloomberg's David Westin on "Bloomberg ‹GO›." (Source: Bloomberg)
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