'Dot Com Bonus Envy' Stymies Wall St. Reform

Dec. 5 (Bloomberg Law) -- The unregulated multi-trillion dollar derivatives market exceeds global GDP and poses a clear danger to the global economy, Chris Whalen, Senior Managing Director at Tangent Capital Partners, and Barry Ritholtz, CEO at Fusion IQ, tell Bloomberg Law's Lee Pacchia. "The fix is very simple," says Ritholtz, "repeal the Commodities Futures Modernization Act and suddenly this becomes like every other financial instrument." Whalen notes that the financial industry is reluctant to change the way derivatives are managed because they generate large returns at a time when banks are less profitable than before. "The super normal returns that they earn from derivatives subsidize the rest of the business," he says. One way or the other, Ritholtz and Whalen believe the financial industry needs to get used to the idea of making less money.

Steel Price Rise Not Enough to Meet Thyssenkrupp’s Target
58:47 - Thyssenkrupp AG, Germany’s largest steelmaker, swung to a net loss in the fiscal first quarter as the steel industry tries to weather a drop in prices wrought by record Chinese exports.The net loss was 23 million euros ($26 million) in the three months through December compared with net income of 50 million euros a year earlier, the Essen-based company said Friday in a statement. Thyssenkrupp CFO Guido Kerkhoff told Bloomberg’s Manus Cranny on “Countdown” he doesn’t see “any more windfall losses currently” in steel business.
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