Heard on Campus: What Would You Change?

  1. Heard on Campus: What Would You Change?
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    Heard on Campus: What Would You Change?

    When it comes to commenting on current events and trends in the B-school marketplace, we hear a lot from administrators, professors, and even employers. But rarely do we hear from the business students themselves.

    In this recurring feature, "Heard on Campus," Bloomberg Businessweek has recruited student journalists at some of the top university newspapers in the country to capture the B-school pulse from the people who are actually living it. In this installment we ask: "If you could change one thing about your school, what would it be?"

    Here's what business students had to say. (Some responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

  2. University of Michigan's Ross School of Business
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    University of Michigan's Ross School of Business

    Allison Berman, 20, undergraduate business student: “The culture. I get the perception that there are a lot of undergraduates in the business school who only care about one thing: getting a job, getting rich, doing their stint, working their hours, putting in their time, and then going on and working some Wall Street job. I understand to some people that is what drives them and gets them up in the morning. There are definitely aspects of it that are attractive to people, and you never know someone’s story and why they’re geared that way, but I just get the impression that the business school, administratively, really wants you to go into one of four fields: finance, strategy, accounting, or marketing. If you don’t go into one of those four fields, the resources for undergraduates are limited.” —As told to Stephanie Steinberg of the Michigan Daily; photo by Marissa McClain

    Marissa McClain/The Michigan Daily
  3. Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business
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    Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business

    Jason Hooper, 28, MBA candidate: “The one thing that I would change about Tuck is the structure of the first year. It would be nice to take an elective earlier in the process. Tuck is known for its rigid structure, which has a lot of benefits, but a lot of us are going into internships in the summer and weren't able to take classes that specifically deal with our focus.” —As told to Emma Fidel of the Dartmouth; photo by Emma Fidel

    Emma Fidel/The Dartmouth
  4. Cornell University's Johnson Graduate School of Management
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    Cornell University's Johnson Graduate School of Management

    Rachel Happen, 21, MBA candidate: “I would increase our activities with other schools. A lot of the time, people get 'siloed' in here and no one really leaves Sage Hall. So I’d like to see more interaction with engineering, with our design school—there’s a lot of cool stuff going on there.” —As told to Michael Linhorst of the Cornell Daily Sun; photo by Michael Linhorst
    Michael Linhorst/The Cornell Daily Sun
  5. Duke University's Fuqua School of Business
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    Duke University's Fuqua School of Business

    Kim Lambert, 27, MBA candidate: “I would say that sometimes the six-week terms can be a bit challenging, getting to know the course work within such a short amount of time. But the good thing about that is you can take a lot of electives because of the way the term structure is set up. (So it’s not semester long, it’s six weeks long rather than 12-week semesters.) But the flip side is that you get ready for your internships a lot faster because you can start taking some of your electives for doing what you really want to do as early as the spring of your first year. ... It’s a challenge. It is something I would maybe look at.” —As told to Taylor Doherty and Lindsey Rupp of the Chronicle at Duke University; photo by Taylor Doherty

    Alice Lee/The Daily Pennsylvanian
  6. Harvard Business School
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    Harvard Business School

    Joseph T. Ferrer, 26, MBA candidate: “I think the biggest thing is probably more integration between the first-year and second-year cohorts. So essentially RCs (required curriculum) and ECs (elective curriculum), so first-years and second-years are kept mostly separate from one another, both structurally and in terms of the curriculum and even social activities. I think the reason they do this is basically to enhance the experience of your cohorts that you come in with. But I do think that there’s a lot to learn from the second-year students who have been through the first-year process, who can provide advice and guidance and mentorship around career support, academic support, etc. That can be incredibly valuable. I think that, by nature, keeping us 'siloed' limits the opportunity for us to learn from their experiences.” —As told to Gina Hackett of the Harvard Crimson; photo by Gina Hackett

    Gina Hackett/The Harvard Crimson
  7. University of Michigan's Ross School of Business
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    University of Michigan's Ross School of Business

    Paul Belin, 32, MBA candidate: “I would reduce the amount of core classes so that it’s just one semester and allow people more time to follow their own tracks—whether it’s finance or consulting. I think the time to take the interesting classes related to your track is limited. So I would want more time for electives.” —As told to Stephanie Steinberg of the Michigan Daily; photo by Marissa McClain

    Marissa McClain/The Michigan Daily
  8. UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business
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    UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business

    Hoyt Hangtian She, 28, MBA candidate: "As much as I appreciate our beautiful campus, rumor says the building ran out of space the moment it was built due to the fast growth of the Haas School of Business during the ’90s. Our school building accommodates all the MBA programs (full-time, evening/weekend, and executive) and undergraduate programs, and has been displaying some operational 'bottlenecks' and high utilization, according to our operations professor. Recently our dean has mentioned to us that a $70 million new construction project is under way and will significantly expand the space for classrooms and student activities. I very much regret that I would not have a chance to enjoy the benefits of the new facilities." —As told to Jamie Applegate of the Daily Californian; photo by Kevin Ho Nguyen

    Kevin Ho Nguyen/The Daily Californian
  9. University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School
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    University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School

    Georgina Rufino, MBA candidate: “[I’d like a] bigger West Coast presence. Right now we get a semester in S.F. with MBAs. We have that San Francisco campus—maybe if we can take some small classes there [regularly] and just have that flexibility, or even take two semesters.” —As told to Jennifer Sun of the Daily Pennsylvanian; photo by Alice Lee

    Alice Lee/The Daily Pennsylvanian
  10. University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business
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    University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business

    Joe Sciarrino, 26, MBA candidate: "To be perfectly honest, the one thing that I would change is the curriculum structure. As a finance student, I’d love to be able to take an earlier finance class, one of those core classes. I would like to get a sense of some concentrations earlier while spacing out the core curriculum over the first year." —As told to Chris Masoud of the Observer at Notre Dame; photo by Chris Masoud

    Chris Masoud/The Observer