Norwegian foreign minister Boerge Brende is seen between the Norwegian (L) and EU flag on his arrival for a meeting with German foreign minister at the foreign ministry's Villa Borsig at lake Tegel in Berlin October 17, 2014. AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Norwegian foreign minister Boerge Brende is seen between the Norwegian (L) and EU flag on his arrival for a meeting with German foreign minister at the foreign ministry's Villa Borsig at lake Tegel in Berlin October 17, 2014. AFP PHOTO / ODD ANDERSEN (Photo credit should read ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images)
Photographer: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

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Every week, hosts Tori Stilwell, Dan Moss and Aki Ito bring you a jargon-free dive into the stories that drive the global economy.

Why is Norway attracting attention in a post-Brexit Britain? Saleha Mohsin, who followed Norwegian politics and economics for Bloomberg, joins Dan Moss to explain `EU Decaf.' How does it work and how is it different, if at all, than being a full member of the EU? You get freedom of goods, services, capital and -- critically -- labor. Norway even contributes to the EU budget!  Yet Norwegians are happy with EU Decaf. Oh, and an EU referendum was defeated there as well. Twice.

Listen to the Benchmark Special Podcast:

SoundCloud: Benchmark Special: Is Norway's `EU Decaf' A Post Brexit Lifeline? by Bloomberg

 

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