• Trump assails political correctness on terrorism in U.S.
  • BIS report points to higher leverage ratios for banks

Here are highlights of the top breaking stories from around the world on Sunday:

BTG Pactual is lining up buyers for almost half its credit portfolio as it deals with the fallout of its billionaire chairman being in jail on charges related to Brazil’s so-called Carwash scandal. 

Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton is naming names -- Facebook, YouTube and Twitter -- after previously calling on Silicon Valley more generally to do more to stop terrorist communications. Republican front-runner Donald Trump, staying with his insistence that the families of the California attackers knew what they were up to, blamed "political correctness" for people being unwilling to finger Islamic terrorists in the U.S.

The National Front made gains in the first stage of French regional elections that were a referendum of sorts on the Paris terror attacks and immigration policies.

Middle East stocks fell, though not by as much as you might have thought, after OPEC’s decision on Friday to allow higher oil production.

The Bank for International Settlements, in its quarterly report, said global regulators should be able to raise required leverage ratios for banks to as much as 5 percent from the current 3 percent without stifling lending. The U.S. and Switzerland already require 5 percent. Emerging-market debt issuance all but stopped in the third quarter due to the commodity-price slump and the slowdown in China’s economy.

A Orbital ATK rocket launched on a supply flight to the International Space Station, the first successful commercial space venture since back-to-back failures by Orbital and Elon Musk’s SpaceX.

The opposition to President Nicolas Maduro appeared to be on its way to winning a majority of National Assembly seats in economic basket-case Venezuela. Analysts have predicted big moves in the country’s dollar bonds depending on the result.

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