Cubs World Series Tickets Would Be Most Expensive in History

The Chicago Cubs celebrate defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the National League Wild Card game at PNC Park on Oct. 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The Chicago Cubs celebrate defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the National League Wild Card game at PNC Park on Oct. 7, 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Photographer: Jared Wickerham/Getty Images
  • Tickets averaging $3,891 on TiqIQ, double site's prior high
  • Team has 106-year title drought, longest in U.S. pro sports

Tickets to see the Chicago Cubs play a World Series game at Wrigley Field -- if they get there -- could cost at least $3,000. And that’s for the cheap seats.

The Cubs take the next step toward their first World Series title since 1908 with the opening game of the National League Division Series tonight at St. Louis. If they win that best-of-five series (and the N.L. Championship Series after that), tickets to see them play for a title would command record-setting, jaw-dropping prices.

At ticket aggregator SeatGeek, tickets for Chicago’s three potential World Series dates at Wrigley Field are listed for an average of $6,750, $6,754 and $8,443, each more than triple the site’s previous record. On competitor TiqIQ, the cheapest ticket for the same dates is listed for around $3,000, with the average asking for $3,891. That’s more than double the most-expensive baseball game in that company’s five-year history, a 2010 World Series match-up between the San Francisco Giants and Texas Rangers ($1,787 average).

Ticket prices will likely drop a bit in the next few weeks because supply is limited — more will hit the market once the Cubs conduct their public sale. If the Cubs were to be eliminated prior to the World Series, all sales would be refunded.

The biggest winners would be the ticket brokers, resale sites and aggregators. Brokers mark the tickets up, resale sites like Razorgator charge fees to the buyer and seller (sometimes as high as 25 percent), and aggregators such as TiqIQ and SeatGeek take a cut if they helped connect the two. There’s little direct benefit to the team and even less to the fans.

The difference in ticket prices is probably a result of different vendors listing on the two aggregator sites.

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