Bitcoin Scheme Suspect Tied to JPMorgan Hack Gets Bail

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Anthony Murgio, who is accused of running a Bitcoin exchange that laundered money and who has been linked to one of the largest bank hacks in U.S. history, can remain free on $100,000 bail.

Under the bail terms set out by U.S Magistrate Judge James Francis in Manhattan Monday, Murgio can travel in parts of Florida and New York to look for a job. Francis ordered him not to communicate with anyone associated with Coin.mx, the bitcoin exchange that he helped run.

Murgio was arrested July 21 at his residence in Florida, the same day that a criminal complaint against him was unsealed in New York. He was released more than a week ago. Murgio faces as long as 20 years in prison if convicted on the money-laundering charge.

Murgio was charged with violating federal anti-money laundering laws by running the cash-for-Bitcoin exchange that allegedly catered to criminals and other customers. According to the allegations, Murgio’s Bitcoin business exchanged at least $1.8 million on behalf of tens of thousands of customers between October 2013 and January 2015.

Murgio and a college fraternity brother were linked to a hack last year of JPMorgan Chase & Co., according to an October FBI memo reviewed by Bloomberg News. That cyberattack compromised personal data of 83 million bank customers over three months. The charges against Murgio don’t involve that incident.

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