The Artisans: Meet Four Young Designers You Need to Know in 2015

Very sharp knives, unexpected jewelry, and a bicycle built for you

Handle materials on Bloodroot Blades vary, from spalted pecan to flooring from a customer's living room. A man in Texas sent in a box of antlers to make a five-knife kitchen set. To get the marbleized pattern, a dollop of Dijon mustard is placed on the blade right after it comes out of the oven. The acid creates an intricate design.
Handle materials on Bloodroot Blades vary, from spalted pecan to flooring from a customer's living room. A man in Texas sent in a box of antlers to make a five-knife kitchen set. To get the marbleized pattern, a dollop of Dijon mustard is placed on the blade right after it comes out of the oven. The acid creates an intricate design.
Photographer: Daniel Shea/Bloomberg Pursuits; Prop stylist: Priscilla Jeong

The Blacksmiths

Luke Snyder (left) and David Van Wyk, the pair behind Bloodroot Blades, make one-of-a-kind knives that are very, very sharp

“Luke and I had been making bespoke knives out of recycled materials for our friends long before we knew anything about business. Once we built a website, chefs in Atlanta began commissioning us for knives, and a few home and design blogs picked us up. The process begins with finding the perfect metal, shaping it, then heat-treating it in a 1,500F oven to harden. From there, blades undergo weeks of testing, grinding, finishing, and sharpening. Foraging for parts is half the fun: We source metals from Volkswagen junkyards and machine shops. These are products we want our customers to have for life—we offer an unconditional lifetime warranty and free service. Even if you run over the knife with your car, we’ll fix it for you free of charge.” From $150 to $700; bloodrootblades.com

From top: Caitlin Mociun's Temple ring is Oregon sunstone surrounded by Burmese moonstone, black diamonds, and micropave; $5,290. Laniakea Supercluster ring with emerald, black diamonds, and antique white diamonds, price upon request.
From top: Caitlin Mociun's Temple ring is Oregon sunstone surrounded by Burmese moonstone, black diamonds, and micropave; $5,290. Laniakea Supercluster ring with emerald, black diamonds, and antique white diamonds, price upon request.
Photographer: Daniel Shea/Bloomberg Pursuits; Prop stylist: Jojo Li; Groomer: Allie Smith, using Chanel and Oribe

The Ring Maker

Caitlin Mociun makes singular jewelry designs using unexpected stones

“I went to Morocco in 2008 and fell in love with all the Bedouin jewelry there. The crescent moon-shaped earrings and gold tassel necklaces inspired me to try my hand at jewelry. I came out with my first collection in 2010—50 pieces of turquoise earrings, necklaces, and rings. To this day, the 14-karat triangle studs from my debut collection are bestsellers. My philosophy is that great design should merge the precious with the practical: I’ll set a rare Australian opal on a curved gold band, for example, or surround an oblong-shaped piece of aquamarine with pinprick-size red diamonds. White solitaires are great, but there’s something unconventionally graceful about an engagement ring with a pear-cut Montana sapphire or a cognac-colored tourmaline. I try to keep that in mind with my everyday collections, which feature hexagon-shaped pearl pendants and emerald-and-black-diamond cluster rings. My trick is not to overdesign anything. I’d rather surprise customers with shapes, colors, and stones that they’d never think to combine.” Custom work from $5,000; mociun.com

Geekhouse's Mudwille racing bike looks great in Illusion orange; the souped-up version goes for $7,500.
Geekhouse's Mudwille racing bike looks great in Illusion orange; the souped-up version goes for $7,500.
Photographer: Daniel Shea/Bloomberg Pursuits; Groomer: Kacie Corbelle

The Bike Designer

Geekhouse's Marty Walsh creates colorful bikes that are tailor-made for your body and your lifestyle

“I got my first mountain bike at 13, and I fell in love with the sport. In 2002, I launched Geekhouse Bikes, a line of bespoke, versatile cycles. Every component, from the leather on the seat to the width of the tires, is built for the individual rider. Our eight-month design process starts with selecting one of seven base styles: The Porteur Brentwood is a no-frills commuter bike; the Rando is for long-haul cross-country bikers. After consulting with clients about lifestyle and injuries, then their neck width and foot size, we handcraft bikes from American steel and finish them in one of 6,500 baked-on powder coats. We work with a local painter who adds designs like art deco patterns or World War I battleships. When you’re spending thousands of dollars on a bike, it should be exactly what you want, even if that means three separate water-bottle holders.” From $1,599; geekhousebikes.com

—As told to Maura Kutner Walters

Before it's here, it's on the Bloomberg Terminal. LEARN MORE