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India Said to Find U.S., China Dumped Solar Products

May 13 (Bloomberg) -- India has found U.S., Chinese, Taiwanese and Malaysian solar-equipment makers dumped products in the local market, according to a document sent to parties involved and obtained by Bloomberg News.

The dumping caused “material injury” to domestic manufacturers Indosolar Ltd., Websol Energy System Ltd. and Jupiter Solar Power Ltd., according to a document dated today and signed by D.P. Mohapatra, a director in India’s Ministry of Commerce & Industry. Mohapatra didn’t respond to two e-mails and four phone calls seeking comment.

The ministry estimated that more than 20 companies sold equipment in India at as little as less than half the regular price in their home markets, according to the document. Parties involved have until May 16 to respond to the ministry’s findings, according to the document.

Four people involved in the antidumping probe, including manufacturers alleging dumping and developers opposed to duties, confirmed the document’s authenticity. Commerce Secretary Rajeev Kher didn’t respond to an e-mail, text message or calls to his mobile phone. Commerce Ministry spokesman Dhiraj Singh said he wasn’t authorized to speak on the matter.

U.S. Panel Makers

“We disagree that we have dumped imports into the Indian market,” Steve Krum, a spokesman for First Solar Corp., the largest U.S. panel-maker, said in an e-mailed statement. “The preliminary decision by the Indian authorities, if upheld, would make serving the Indian market very difficult.”

SunPower Corp., the second-biggest U.S. panel producer, said its focus in Asia is in Japan, China and the Middle East, and Ingrid Ekstrom, a spokeswoman, declined to address Indian trade issues. Canadian Solar Inc., the best-performing solar manufacturer in the past year, didn’t respond to inquiries today.

India started the antidumping investigation in November 2012. The Commerce Ministry faces a May 22 deadline to decide whether to recommend the imposition of duties on imports.

To contact the reporter on this story: Natalie Obiko Pearson in New Delhi at npearson7@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Reed Landberg at landberg@bloomberg.net Will Wade, Carlos Caminada

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