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Darvish Loses No-Hitter for Second Time With Two Outs in Ninth

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Rangers Pitcher Yu Darvish
Yu Darvish of the Texas Rangers throws against the Boston Red Sox at Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas, on May 9, 2014. Photographer: Ronald Martinez/Getty Images

May 10 (Bloomberg) -- Yu Darvish of the Texas Rangers lost a no-hitter with two outs in the ninth inning for the second time in a little more than a year.

After Dustin Pedroia grounded out and Shane Victorino struck out with the Boston Red Sox trailing 8-0 in the ninth, David Ortiz hit a hard ground ball into right field for a single to prevent Darvish from throwing his first Major League Baseball no-hitter.

For the second straight year, Darvish missed the chance to pitch the first no-hitter of the MLB season. Kenny Rogers was the last Texas pitcher to get a no-hitter when he threw the franchise’s only perfect game on July 28, 1994.

Darvish on April 2, 2013, came within one out of pitching the earliest perfect game in an MLB season. The 27-year-old right-hander, who joined the Rangers in 2012 after a record $51.7 million transfer from Japan, was on the verge of throwing the 24th perfect game in MLB history until Houston’s Marwin Gonzalez singled up the middle with two outs in the ninth.

Darvish lost his bid for a perfect game last night with two outs in the seventh inning at Globe Life Park in Arlington, Texas, when an Ortiz popup fell between two fielders and was ruled an error on right fielder Alex Rios.

“That’s the worst call in Major League Baseball history,” said MLB Network analyst Harold Reynolds, who thought the dropped ball should have been called a hit because it didn’t touch a fielder’s glove.

Darvish was taken out of the game after allowing Ortiz’s single in the ninth, having thrown 126 pitches. He finished with 12 strikeouts and two walks.

To contact the reporter on this story: Dex McLuskey in Dallas at dmcluskey@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net Erik Matuszewski

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