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Williams Advances at Searing Australian Open; Djokovic Wins

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Tennis Player Novak Djokovic
Novak Djokovic of Serbia serves in his second round match against Leonardo Mayer of Argentina during day three of the 2014 Australian Open at Melbourne Park in Melbourne on Jan. 15, 2014. Photographer: Quinn Rooney/Getty Images

Jan. 15 (Bloomberg) -- Five-time champion Serena Williams lost three games while advancing to the third round of the Australian Open tennis tournament as temperatures soared above 106 degrees Fahrenheit (41.1 Celsius) for the second straight afternoon.

Novak Djokovic, who has won three straight titles in Melbourne and is the men’s No. 2 seed this year, defeated Argentina’s Leonardo Mayer in three sets. No. 3 David Ferrer of Spain, No. 7 Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic, No. 8 Stanislas Wawrinka of Switzerland and No. 9 Richard Gasquet of France also advanced.

Williams, 32, the women’s top seed who won in Melbourne in 2003, 2005, 2007, 2009 and 2010, had 10 aces while defeating 104th-ranked Vesna Dolonc of Serbia 6-1, 6-2 in 63 minutes.

“You just try to get a bunch of aces and a bunch of winners, because it’s too hot to get into rallies,” Williams said in a televised interview. “I think it’s going to get worse as the day goes along, so I was fortunate to play early.”

Yesterday two players and a ball-boy received medical treatment as the temperature reached 108 degrees. Canada’s Frank Dancevic described the organizers’ decision to allow play as “inhumane.”

The tournament tied the record for the most retirements in a single round at a Grand Slam event since tennis went professional in 1968. Eight men and one woman quit their first-round matches in Melbourne, organizers said. The opening round of the 2011 U.S. Open also saw nine withdrawals, as did last year’s second round at Wimbledon.

Heat Wave

Today’s temperature peaked at 106, organizers said. The heat is forecast to continue for two more days, hitting 108 on Jan. 17 before dropping by 40 degrees the following day.

“The last thing I want to do is to cramp in this weather,” Williams said in a news conference. “It can happen so easy. Just drinking a tremendous amount of water.”

Williams, who tied Margaret Court’s record of 60 Australian Open wins in the professional era, is seeking her 18th Grand Slam singles title, which would tie her with Chris Evert and Martina Navratilova.

China’s Li Na, a two-time finalist in Melbourne and the fourth seed this year, preceded Williams on the Rod Laver Arena court and won 6-0, 7-6 (7-5) against Belinda Bencic of Switzerland.

Djokovic’s Win

Djokovic followed Williams at Rod Laver Arena, and never faced a break point in his 6-0, 6-4, 6-4 win against Mayer. Djokovic, from Serbia, had only 11 unforced errors in the match and said he tried not to be distracted by the extreme heat.

“It’s not just physically,” he told reporters. “Mentally you need to be tough enough to not give up and not think about what conditions can do to you.”

Berdych and Gasquet also won in straight sets. Ferrer needed four sets to get past Adrian Mannarino of France. American Sam Querrey advanced by defeating No. 23 Ernests Gulbis of Latvia in straight sets.

In the night matches, Wawrinka beat Alejandro Falla of Colombia in four sets, and Australia’s Sam Stosur, the women’s 17th seed, lost only two games while beating Bulgaria’s Tsvetana Pironkova. American Madison Keys was defeated by China’s Zheng Jie in three sets.

To contact the reporters on this story: Rob Gloster in San Francisco at rgloster@bloomberg.net; Ben Priechenfried in London at bprie@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net

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