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Former Dolphins’ Martin Meets NFL Investigator Over Bullying

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Former Dolphins Player Jonathan Martin
Former Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Jonathan Martin left the team after he alleged he was harassed for the 1½ seasons he spent with the Dolphins. Photographer: Joel Auerbach/Getty Images

Nov. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Former Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Jonathan Martin met yesterday with the National Football League investigator probing accusations of bullying by teammates, his attorney David Cornwell said.

Martin left the team after he alleged he was harassed for the 1½ seasons he spent with the Dolphins. Miami suspended indefinitely offensive lineman Richie Incognito on Nov. 3 for conduct detrimental to the team after an expletive-filled voice message he sent to Martin became public.

Martin went into “great detail” with New York lawyer Ted Wells and his staff about the issue, said Cornwell, a partner with Gorden & Rees LLP in Atlanta, in an e-mail.

The player declined to discuss the contents of the meeting publicly and said he was prepared to sit down with Dolphins’ management including owner Stephen Ross and Chief Executive Officer Tom Garfinkel.

“This is the right way to handle the matter,” Martin said in the statement. “Beyond that, I look forward to working through the process and resuming my career in the National Football League.”

Incognito has filed a grievance against the Dolphins that challenges his suspension, said the NFL Players Association two days ago. The player sees a hearing on an expedited basis so he can return to the Dolphins.

The National Football League’s collective bargaining agreement states that the maximum suspension a team can issue for detrimental conduct is four games, plus one additional game check.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nancy Kercheval in Washington at nkercheval@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor on this story: Sylvia Wier in New York at swier@bloomberg.net

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