Bloomberg "Anywhere" Remote Login Bloomberg "Terminal" Request a Demo

Bloomberg

Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world.

Company

Financial Products

Enterprise Products

Media

Customer Support

  • Americas

    +1 212 318 2000

  • Europe, Middle East, & Africa

    +44 20 7330 7500

  • Asia Pacific

    +65 6212 1000

Communications

Industry Products

Media Services

Follow Us

Peak Coal Passed in 2008 as Mining Costs Rise, Group Says

A bulldozer operates atop a mound of coal at the Tennessee Valley Authority Paradise Fossil Plant in Paradise, Kentucky. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg
A bulldozer operates atop a mound of coal at the Tennessee Valley Authority Paradise Fossil Plant in Paradise, Kentucky. Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Oct. 30 (Bloomberg) -- Coal reserves in the U.S. are lower than government and industry estimates because the shallow deposits that are cheaper to access have been largely mined out, according to a study by a group urging the country to pursue renewable energy.

Clean Energy Action in Boulder, Colorado, said in a report today that the U.S. passed its peak coal production in 2008, and that production will become increasingly difficult and expensive across the country. Only one of the top 16 coal-producing states, Indiana, is likely to see record production in the future. Traditional producers such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia hit their peak decades ago, it said.

“If coal will continue to be mined profitably, not much of it will be mined,” Leslie Glustrom, director of research and policy at the group, said on a conference call today.

The group’s conclusions are at odds with forecasts from the U.S. Energy Information Administration and the National Mining Association. Coal production and use in the U.S. has bounced back this year, after production fell to a two-decade low in 2012, and coal use in power plants for power production was displaced by cheap natural gas.

This year, coal use rose more than 8 percent over the first six months of 2013 compared to the same period in 2012, while coal production could fall again, according to the EIA.

Mining Association

Hal Quinn, the president of the National Mining Association, said Oct. 21 in a meeting with Bloomberg editors and reporters that coal use is projected to be up 7.5 percent this year compared to 2012, and its use will continue largely unabated through 2020, even in the face of a boost in production of natural gas and a 2015 deadline for new regulations from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Quinn’s group, which represents companies such as Arch Coal Inc. and Peabody Energy Corp., held a rally with coal miners on Capitol Hill yesterday at which supporters said the U.S. has a 200-year supply of coal, and that if the EPA backs off more regulation, the fuel represents the cheapest way to produce electricity.

The environmental group’s report today said the cost of delivering coal rose 7.72 percent a year from 2004 to 2012, twice the rate of inflation, and expenses are likely to continue to rise. Meanwhile, the EIA data used to estimate a 200-year supply of coal is faulty, because it doesn’t fully capture the economic viability of mining that coal, it said.

“Rising coal costs reflect the rising costs of production for coal as it becomes increasingly difficult to access the remaining coal,” the report said.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mark Drajem in Washington at mdrajem@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Jon Morgan at jmorgan97@bloomberg.net

Please upgrade your Browser

Your browser is out-of-date. Please download one of these excellent browsers:

Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera or Internet Explorer.