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Colder Weather to Grip Central U.S. as October Ends

Oct. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Below-normal temperatures are expected to grip the central and eastern U.S. as October ends, said Matt Rogers, president of Commodity Weather Group LLC in Bethesda, Maryland.

Temperatures may be 8 degrees Fahrenheit (4.4 Celsius) lower than usual in the northern Great Plains and Midwest from Oct. 26 to Oct. 30, Rogers said today. Readings are expected to be 3 to 5 degrees below normal from the Rocky Mountains into New England, an area including Chicago, New York and Dallas.

A blocking pattern over Alaska “looks to drive a series of progressively stronger early-season cold pushes into the mid-continent starting next week,” Rogers said.

Below-normal temperatures tend to increase energy consumption as people turn up thermostats to heat homes and businesses. Power generation accounts for 32 percent of U.S. natural gas demand, according to the Energy Information Administration, the Energy Department’s statistical arm. About 49 percent of all homes use the fuel for heating.

Temperatures are expected to be below normal across the central U.S., including Chicago and Dallas, from Oct. 21 to 25.

The normal average temperature in New York for Oct. 24 is about 55 degrees, according to MDA Weather Services in Gaithersburg, Maryland. In Boston, it’s 52; in St. Louis, 57; Dallas, 65; Chicago, 50; and in Burbank, California, it’s 65.

To contact the reporter on this story: Brian K. Sullivan in Boston at bsullivan10@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Dan Stets at dstets@bloomberg.net

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