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Barclays Hires Deutsche Bank’s Zhou for China Investment Banking

Barclays Hires Deutsche Bank's Zhou for China Investment Banking
Barclays helped arrange a $2 billion bond sale for CNPC in April, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Barclays Plc, the U.K.’s second-largest lender by assets, hired Deutsche Bank AG Vice President Zhou Bo for its investment banking team to help cover natural-resources clients in China.

Zhou, who is based in Hong Kong, will join the London-based bank as a vice president in late October, Angie Tang, a Barclays spokeswoman, wrote in an e-mail today. Three calls to Zhou’s mobile phone went straight to voicemail.

Zhou studied for a masters of business administration at the University of Michigan and a science degree from Zhejiang University, according to Barclays. His father is Zhou Jiping, who was named in April as chairman of China National Petroleum Corp., the nation’s largest oil producer, three people with knowledge of the matter said.

“We are convinced that people who join us come with a track record and proven technical skills from their prior experience” in investment banking, wrote Tang, who is based in Hong Kong. Barclays hires people “with a strong technical background,” she said.

Barclays helped arrange a $2 billion bond sale for CNPC in April, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The lender advised on a December transaction where PetroChina Co., a CNPC unit, bought a 49.9 percent stake in an Alberta shale-gas project from Encana Corp.

Candice Sun, a Hong Kong-based spokeswoman at Deutsche Bank, declined to comment.

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