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Scene Last Night: Dan Loeb, Glenn Fuhrman at Charlie Bird

Glenn Fuhrman, co-founder of MSD Capital LP and founder of the Flag Art Foundation, with Cynthia Daignault, a painter. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg
Glenn Fuhrman, co-founder of MSD Capital LP and founder of the Flag Art Foundation, with Cynthia Daignault, a painter. Photographer: Amanda Gordon/Bloomberg

July 11 (Bloomberg) -- Charlie Bird, the new restaurant in Manhattan’s SoHo district helmed by a former chef from the Little Nell in Aspen, had a game of hedge-fund musical chairs last night.

Soon after Dan Loeb of Third Point LLC wrapped up a dinner for six, skipping dessert, Glenn Fuhrman of MSD Capital LP took Loeb’s seat with his 40 or so guests.

Loeb, in a white button-down and jeans, said hello to Fuhrman, in a polo shirt and khakis, before heading out, sympathizing as Fuhrman worked out the seating assignments.

Fuhrman’s dinner celebrated the opening of the show “Something About a Tree” at his Flag Art Foundation, curated by writer Linda Yablonsky. Mickalene Thomas and Jim Hodges and the other artists in the show dominated the guest list, interspersed with curators such as Laura Hoptman of the Museum of Modern Art, Massimiliano Gioni of the New Museum and Carter Foster of the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Fuhrman sat with painter Cynthia Daignault and sculptor Nancy Grossman, whose leather-with-zipper heads are included in the other show up at Flag, “Personal, Political, Mysterious.”

In his toast, Fuhrman thanked artist Ugo Rondinone for introducing him to Grossman. Yablonsky thanked Rondinone too, for lending the fiberglass prototype of his tree sculpture “bright shiny morning.”

Another work in the show is a tree trunk with eyes embedded in it, by Tim Rollins and Kids of Survival, an artist’s collaborative Rollins started in the 1980s with children he taught in the South Bronx.

Flag Family

Between courses, Fuhrman came over to meet Rollins, singing a line from Jay-Z’s new song “Picasso Baby,” which he’d learned earlier in the day watching Jay-Z film footage for a music video at Pace Gallery. There was talk of a studio visit and Fuhrman’s first art purchase, inspired by photographs on the walls at Goldman Sachs where he worked after college.

Fuhrman spoke of his “Flag family,” noting that Jennifer Dalton has been in four Flag shows. So has Robert Gober. Hodges has been in eight.

As for the Charlie Bird meal, served family style: live diver scallops with brown butter and garlic chives tasted straight out of the sea, winning quick praise around the table.

There were also plenty of takers for the Tuscan chicken liver and farro salad with pistachio and mint, and many other dishes starring radishes and fava beans. Incredibly the meal didn’t end there: a pasta course arrived, followed by plates of black bass, roasted chicken and suckling pig.

Dessert was a chocolate cake with olive oil gelato, which would have been perfect without the accompaniment of caramelized rice crispies.

Fashion Set

CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund held a party at Rag & Bone attended by Anna Wintour and Andrew Rosen, founder and chief executive of Theory.

BuzzFeed Fashion gathered at the nightclub Provocateur, where shirtless waiters in tiger-like body paint served drinks and dumplings.

Sounds racy, but most of the guests were fully dressed, and Rachel Weiss, vice president of digital strategy at L’Oreal USA, was even outfitted with a BuzzFeed sticker labeling her a “geek.”

Weiss noted the next fashion party on her docket: the launch on July 16 of Project Gravitas, a dress line with shapewear built in. The dresses make you look 20 pounds thinner, she said.

(Amanda Gordon is a writer and photographer for Muse, the arts and leisure section of Bloomberg News. Any opinions expressed are her own.)

Muse highlights include Jason Harper on cars, Lance Esplund on art.

To contact the reporter on this story: Amanda Gordon in New York at agordon01@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Manuela Hoelterhoff at mhoelterhoff@bloomberg.net

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