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Snowden Shows China Needs to Improve Network, Global Times Says

Snowden Shows China Needs to Improve Network, Global Times Says
U.S. accusations against China on Internet security have gained momentum while “the reality is that the U.S. itself can attack China almost at will,” the Global Times editorial said. Photographer: Nelson Ching/Bloomberg

June 24 (Bloomberg) -- Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden’s revelations of U.S. spy programs benefit the world and show that China must catch up in network security, the Asian nation’s state-run Global Times newspaper said.

Snowden’s disclosures of the classified intelligence activities exposed the “extraordinary hegemony” of the U.S. as well as its cyber-espionage and infringement of civil rights, the newspaper said. That’s put the U.S. “on the moral back foot,” it said.

Snowden left Hong Kong yesterday for Moscow after the city turned down a U.S. arrest warrant, and is now seeking asylum in Ecuador. U.S. officials have expressed anger at China and Russia for their role in allowing him to leave Hong Kong, whose foreign and defense relations are determined by Beijing.

U.S. accusations against China on Internet security have gained momentum while “the reality is that the U.S. itself can attack China almost at will,” the Global Times editorial said. China needs to have a “sense of urgency” in developing its Internet technology, it said.

Snowden fled the U.S. before revealing himself as the source of leaks about National Security Agency programs to the Guardian and Washington Post newspapers. His departure from Hong Kong followed a report in yesterday’s Sunday Morning Post that cited Snowden as saying the U.S. National Security Agency hacked Chinese mobile-phone text messages.

Mainframe Computers

In the first five months of this year a total of 4,062 U.S.-based control servers hijacked 2.91 million mainframe computers in China, the China Daily newspaper reported today, citing the National Computer Network Emergency Response Technical Team Coordination Center of China.

Snowden revealed that Tsinghua University, one of China’s top universities, was a target of extensive U.S. hacking, the South China Morning Post reported. On a single day in January, at least 63 computers and servers were hacked into, it said.

China has expressed “serious concern” about the reports of U.S. government cyber attacks against China, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Hua Chunying said, and filed a protest to the U.S.

To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Henry Sanderson in Beijing at hsanderson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Rosalind Mathieson at rmathieson3@bloomberg.net

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