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Ray Lewis Joins ESPN as NFL TV Analyst After Winning Super Bowl

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Former NFL Player Ray Lewis
Former National Football League player Ray Lewis will start with ESPN as a studio analyst on Aug. 1 and will appear on the network’s “Monday Night Countdown,” “Sunday Night Countdown” and “SportsCenter” programs. Photographer: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

March 13 (Bloomberg) -- All-Pro linebacker Ray Lewis, who retired from the National Football League after helping the Baltimore Ravens win the Super Bowl last month, is joining Walt Disney Co.’s ESPN network as an NFL analyst.

Lewis, 37, is a two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year and 12-time Pro Bowl selection who won two Super Bowl titles with the Ravens during his 17-year career.

“I’m ready to bring the same level of passion to this next phase of my life as I brought to the field during my years as a player,” Lewis said in a statement. Lewis will start with ESPN as a studio analyst on Aug. 1 and will appear on the network’s “Monday Night Countdown,” “Sunday Night Countdown” and “SportsCenter” programs.

His career was threatened in January 2000, when he was involved in a post-Super Bowl fight outside an Atlanta night club that resulted in two people being stabbed to death.

Lewis initially was charged with murder and aggravated assault. The charges were dropped the following June when Lewis pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of obstruction and agreed to testify against two of his former friends, who later were acquitted.

The NFL fined Lewis $250,000, the largest levied against a league player at that time, though he wasn’t suspended. The next season he led the Ravens to their first Super Bowl title.

To contact the reporter on this story: Erik Matuszewski in New York at matuszewski@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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