Bloomberg Anywhere Login

Bloomberg

Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world.

Company

Financial Products

Enterprise Products

Media

Customer Support

  • Americas

    +1 212 318 2000

  • Europe, Middle East, & Africa

    +44 20 7330 7500

  • Asia Pacific

    +65 6212 1000

Communications

Industry Products

Media Services

Follow Us

Brad Corbett, Former Texas Rangers Principal Owner, Dies at 75

Texas Rangers owner Brad Corbett, right,  poses with U.S. President Gerald Ford, left, and catcher Jim Sundberg at the Rangers opening game of the season in Arlington, Texas, on April 9, 1976. Source: MLB Photos via Getty Images
Texas Rangers owner Brad Corbett, right, poses with U.S. President Gerald Ford, left, and catcher Jim Sundberg at the Rangers opening game of the season in Arlington, Texas, on April 9, 1976. Source: MLB Photos via Getty Images

Dec. 26 (Bloomberg) -- Brad Corbett, the Texas Rangers’ principal owner from 1974 through 1980, has died. He was 75.

The Major League Baseball team said Corbett died on Dec. 24. It gave no details.

During Corbett’s ownership, the Rangers produced their first four winning seasons and finished second three times in the American League West. The team’s 94 victories in 1977 were the most in its history until 1999.

“The spirit in which Mr. Corbett served as owner of the Rangers will be remembered always,” the team said in a statement on its website.

Corbett moved from Long Island, New York, to Fort Worth, Texas, in 1968. He turned a $300,000 loan from the Small Business Administration into millions in the plastic-piping and chemical-tubing business, according to the Dallas Morning News.

In 1974, Corbett formed a group of local investors and bought the Rangers from Bob Short two days before the start of the season for $9.6 million and $1 million in assumed debt.

Corbett wanted to build a winner fast, and was known for trading promising young talent for veterans and for employing four managers in a span of eight games, the Morning News said.

He sold the team to a group led by oilman Eddie Chiles in 1980.

To contact the reporter on this story: Curtis Eichelberger in Wilmington, Delaware at ceichelberge@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

Please upgrade your Browser

Your browser is out-of-date. Please download one of these excellent browsers:

Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera or Internet Explorer.