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NYC Best: Paul Rudd, Brooklyn Books, Bon Iver, Met Opera

Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. The band is playing at Radio City Music Hall this weekend. Photographer: Kevin Winter/Getty Images via Bloomberg
Justin Vernon of Bon Iver. The band is playing at Radio City Music Hall this weekend. Photographer: Kevin Winter/Getty Images via Bloomberg

Sept. 22 (Bloomberg) -- Indie folk band Bon Iver rocks out Radio City Music Hall this weekend.

After grabbing a pair of 2012 Grammy Awards, the group is touring in support of its self-titled album.

Justin Vernon can go from thoughtful yearning to full-on flash in a single song, and he’s brought an 8-piece band that can definitely keep up.

At RCMH, 1260 Sixth Ave. Information: +1-212-247-4777; http://www.radiocity.com.

Also in town: “I’ll Be Your Mirror,” curated by Greg Dulli of the Afghan Whigs together with All Tomorrow’s Parties, the traveling music festival.

The lineup includes Frank Ocean, the Antlers, the Dirtbombs, Hot Snakes and Quintron and Miss Pussycat, as well as comics Hannibal Buress, Janeane Garofalo and Kurt Braunohler.

For the literary set, Lapham’s Quarterly editors will be on hand to consider a pair of books also chosen by Greg Dulli.

Runs through Sept. 23 at Pier 36, 299 South St. Information: http://www.illbeyourmirror.com.

Visit Christopher Columbus in his new living room.

Tatzu Nishi has erected a contemporary space with flat-screen TV high up where Columbus has perched on his granite column since 1892.

Climb up for a close-up.

“Tatzu Nishi: Discovering Columbus” runs through Nov. 18 at Broadway and Eighth Ave. Information: +1-212-223-7800; http://www.publicartfund.org.

Andy Warhol’s Brillo boxes, Campbell’s Soup cans and celebs like Marilyn and Mao are in the spotlight at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Such improbably different artists as Cindy Sherman, Jeff Koons and Gerhard Richter were all influenced by the wigged Popmaster. Warhol’s preoccupations -- the elevation of the commonplace, the worship of celebrity, sex and gender identity, the recycling of pre-existing sources -- are all now cultural touchstones.

“Regarding Warhol: Sixty Artists, Fifty Years” runs at the Met, 1000 Fifth Ave. through Dec. 31. Information: +1-212-535-7710; http://www.metmuseum.org.

Saturday Matinee

Paul Rudd is back onstage in “Grace,” Craig Wright’s darkly comic tale of a couple of fundamentalist Christians who plan to open a motel chain inspired by the Bible: “Where would Jesus stay?”

Kate Arrington plays his wife, Ed Asner is a cantankerous exterminator while Michael Shannon gets to be the voice of reason as a bitter scientist.

In previews at the Cort Theatre, 138 W. 48th St., for an Oct. 4 opening. Information: +1-212-239-6200; http://www.graceonbroadway.com.

Stop by Joe Allen for meatloaf and a glass of Cabernet.

At 326 W. 46th St. Information: +1-212-581-6464

Saturday Night

The New York Philharmonic inaugurates its fall season with “The Rite of Spring,” Stravinsky’s propulsive paean to the life force.

The impeccable Leif Ove Andsnes joins Alan Gilbert for Beethoven’s Third Piano Concerto.

Also on the program, Gyorgy Kurtag’s mini concerto “...quasi una fantasia...,” with instrumentalists playing from the back of the hall.

At Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center. Information: +1-212-875-5656; http://nyphil.org.

Sunday

Hear Pete Hamill, Joyce Carol Oates and Colson Whitehead, along with about 280 other writers, discuss their work at the 7th annual Brooklyn Book Festival.

Head down to Borough Hall Plaza and wander through the booths of large and small publishers, then listen to a panel about money in fiction, the perils of middle school or how to publish your own book, among many other topics.

Information: http://www.brooklynbookfestival.org.

Sunday Matinee

The New York City Ballet’s fall season gets under way with a celebration of Balanchine and Stravinsky.

The composer wrote music to order for the choreographer’s Greek trio inspired by classical themes: sunny “Apollo,” mournful “Orpheus” and the cerebral “Agon.”

Don’t miss Robert Fairchild as the young god Apollo discovering art for the first time.

David H. Koch Theater, Lincoln Center. Information: +1-212-496-0600; http://www.nycballet.com.

Sit outside and people watch at Cafe Fiorello with a pepperoni arugula thin-crust pizza.

At 1900 Broadway. Information: +1-212-595-5330.

Looking Ahead

Jewels, stars, decolletage -- it’s opening night at the Metropolitan Opera on Monday.

For the second year in a row, Anna Netrebko gets the gala spotlight, this time as the rich and seductive Adina in Donizetti’s “L’Elisir d’Amore.”

Matthew Polenzani and Mariusz Kwiecien vie for her affections in the new production directed by Bartlett Sher.

The performance will be shown live on big screens in Lincoln Center Plaza and Times Square.

At the Met Opera, Lincoln Center. Information: +1-212-362-6000; http://www.metoperafamily.org.

(Zinta Lundborg is an editor for Muse, the arts and leisure section of Bloomberg News. The opinions expressed are her own.)

Muse highlights include Lewis Lapham’s podcast and Greg Evans on film.

To contact the reporter on this story: Zinta Lundborg at zlundborg@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Manuela Hoelterhoff at mhoelterhoff@bloomberg.net.

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