Bloomberg Anywhere Login

Bloomberg

Connecting decision makers to a dynamic network of information, people and ideas, Bloomberg quickly and accurately delivers business and financial information, news and insight around the world.

Company

Financial Products

Enterprise Products

Media

Customer Support

  • Americas

    +1 212 318 2000

  • Europe, Middle East, & Africa

    +44 20 7330 7500

  • Asia Pacific

    +65 6212 1000

Communications

Industry Products

Media Services

Follow Us

‘Failing’ Syria Peace Plan Raises Question of What’s Next

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon reiterated his call for an immediate halt to the violence, focusing on Syrian government violations of the cease-fire terms, and for more UN observers to join the advance contingent of 15 monitors now in Syria. Photographer: Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon reiterated his call for an immediate halt to the violence, focusing on Syrian government violations of the cease-fire terms, and for more UN observers to join the advance contingent of 15 monitors now in Syria. Photographer: Raveendran/AFP/Getty Images

May 4 (Bloomberg) -- At least 24 Syrians were killed by security forces during protests across the country, according to an opposition group.

Twelve people were killed in the northern province of Idlib and others died today in areas including Aleppo near the Turkish border and Daraa in the south, the Local Coordination Committees of Syria said in an e-mailed statement.

The group says more than 500 people have died since a cease-fire went into effect on April 12. The truce was brokered by United Nations envoy Kofi Annan and agreed to by President Bashar al-Assad and the leading opposition groups.

The UN is seeking to recruit 300 observers to bolster a monitoring mission in Syria to assess the cease-fire. The U.S. and allies have expressed skepticism about the accord and say they are preparing tougher measures against Assad.

Syria’s government has blamed the violence on foreign-backed extremist groups, and says parliamentary elections due on May 7 mark a step toward the political openness that the Syrian public is seeking.

To contact the reporters on this story: Dahlia Kholaif in Kuwait at dkholaif@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew J. Barden at barden@bloomberg.net

Please upgrade your Browser

Your browser is out-of-date. Please download one of these excellent browsers:

Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Opera or Internet Explorer.