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Clemens Subpoenas Congress for Records in Perjury Case

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Feb. 11 (Bloomberg) -- Ex-New York Yankees pitcher Roger Clemens, who is charged with perjury, has subpoenaed the U.S. House of Representatives for information from its probe into steroid use in Major League Baseball.

The subpoena, issued yesterday by one of Clemens’s lawyers, seeks “interview summaries, notes and memorandum” related to the February 2008 House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform hearing on steroids. The document names 20 individuals it said is covered by the subpoena, including former baseball players Jose Canseco, Andrew Pettitte and Chuck Knoblauch.

The subpoena said the committee must appear in U.S. Judge Reggie Walton’s courtroom in Washington to testify on March 14.

“The committee intends to consult with the House General Counsel’s office and will meet its obligations in this matter,” Kurt Bardella, a committee spokesman, said in an e-mail.

Clemens, 48, was indicted in August on one count of obstructing a congressional investigation, three counts of making false statements and two counts of perjury. Clemens, who also played for the Boston Red Sox, Toronto Blue Jays and Houston Astros over a 24-year Major League Baseball career, pleaded not guilty.

He faces a $1.5 million fine and a maximum of 30 years in prison if convicted on all charges. Jury selection is scheduled to begin July 6.

Rusty Hardin, Clemens’s lawyer, didn’t immediately return a phone message seeking comment.

In a Dec. 8 order, Walton gave Clemens’s lawyers the authority to issue subpoenas to third parties, including Congress.

The case is U.S. v. Clemens, 10-cr-00223, U.S. District Court, District of Columbia (Washington).

To contact the reporter on this story: Tom Schoenberg in Washington at tschoenberg@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: David E. Rovella at drovella@bloomberg.net.

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