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U.S. Envoy Richard Holbrooke in Intensive Care

Dec. 10 (Bloomberg) -- Richard Holbrooke, the U.S. special envoy for Afghanistan and Pakistan, is in the intensive care unit at George Washington University Hospital in Washington, according to a hospital official who asked not to be identified.

Holbrooke, 69, has spent the last two years traveling to Afghanistan and Pakistan, and seeking support from allies to help promote economic development and stabilize the neighboring countries that have been plagued by terrorism.

Holbrooke felt ill while working today on the seventh floor of the State Department headquarters, where Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s office is located, said Philip J. Crowley, the department spokesman.

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner was also admitted today to George Washington University Hospital in northwest Washington for surgery to remove a kidney stone.

Holbrooke is a veteran diplomat who, as an assistant secretary of state under President Bill Clinton, was the chief architect of the 1995 Dayton accords that ended the war in Bosnia in the 1990s. He later served as the U.S. envoy to the United Nations.

He was a diplomat in President Jimmy Carter’s administration and was in charge of U.S. relations with China when the U.S. normalized ties in December 1978.

Over the last several months, Holbrooke has been preparing a report for President Barack Obama on the current state of governance and development in Afghanistan. The U.S. and allies have a combined force of about 150,000 troops to turn back Taliban advances and train Afghan soldiers and police.

To contact the reporter on this story: Indira Lakshmanan in Washington at ilakshmanan@bloomberg.net; Flavia Krause-Jackson in Washington at fjackson@bloomberg.net.

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Bob Drummond at bdrummond@bloomberg.net

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