Economics has been a mostly male club. Until now. Women got 22% of the economics PhDs in 1992, vs. 10% in 1975. Almost one-half of practicing economists in the U.S. in 1993 were female, compared with one-third back in 1985, reports the Labor Dept.

Leading the way are four women who occupy some of Bill Clinton's most senior economic posts. Alice Rivlin is moving up in Washington's pecking order, climbing from No.2 in the White House budget office to No.1. Laura D'Andrea Tyson chairs the Council of Economic Advisers. Joan Spero serves as the State Dept.'s Under Secretary for economic policy. And over at Treasury, Alicia Munnell is Assistant Secretary for economic policy. She quips: "We've graduated from home economics to macroeconomics."

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