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London Mayor Johnson Plans to Run for Tories in Uxbridge

Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

Mayor of London Boris Johnson. Johnson’s plan to run next year in Uxbridge, a seat that’s been held by the Tories since 1970, was announced by the mayor’s office in a statement today. Close

Mayor of London Boris Johnson. Johnson’s plan to run next year in Uxbridge, a seat... Read More

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Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

Mayor of London Boris Johnson. Johnson’s plan to run next year in Uxbridge, a seat that’s been held by the Tories since 1970, was announced by the mayor’s office in a statement today.

Mayor Boris Johnson will bid to become the Conservative candidate for the Uxbridge district of northwest London amid speculation that he wants to win a parliamentary seat to succeed David Cameron as prime minister.

Johnson’s plan to run next year in Uxbridge, a seat that’s been held by the Tories since 1970, was announced by the mayor’s office in a statement today.

Johnson, who once represented Henley, west of London, in the House of Commons, announced three weeks ago that he intends to return to Parliament while serving out his second term as mayor, which ends in 2016. He’s the favorite with bookmaker Ladbrokes Plc to take over from Cameron as Tory leader, ahead of Home Secretary Theresa May and Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne.

Johnson’s vote-winning capacity, at least in London, was illustrated in 2012 when he retained his job as mayor in the face of a national trend that saw gains for the opposition Labour Party. The city’s successful staging of the Olympic Games later that year heightened his profile further.

To contact the reporter on this story: Eddie Buckle in London at ebuckle@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Alan Crawford at acrawford6@bloomberg.net Fergal O’Brien

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