Geoff Bobroff, Fund Consultant, Dies of Heart Attack at 70

Source: Bobroff Consulting via Bloomberg

Geoff Bobroff, a mutual fund executive and prominent industry consultant, has died at the age of 70. Bobroff was the principal employee of Bobroff Consulting, the East Greenwich firm he established in 1993. Close

Geoff Bobroff, a mutual fund executive and prominent industry consultant, has died at... Read More

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Source: Bobroff Consulting via Bloomberg

Geoff Bobroff, a mutual fund executive and prominent industry consultant, has died at the age of 70. Bobroff was the principal employee of Bobroff Consulting, the East Greenwich firm he established in 1993.

Geoffrey H. Bobroff, a money management consultant whose career in the investment industry spanned five decades, has died. He was 70.

He was stricken on July 20 at his home in East Greenwich, Rhode Island, and died in route to a hospital, his wife, Lucille Comes, said in a telephone interview. The cause was an apparent heart attack.

Bobroff founded Bobroff Consulting Inc. in 1993, according to a notice on the website of Hill Funeral Home in East Greenwich. He previously worked as a senior vice president of Lipper Analytical Services Inc. in Denver and an executive vice president at Integrated Resources Inc. Bobroff began his career as a trial attorney with the Securities and Exchange Commission in Washington.

As a consultant, Bobroff was often quoted by journalists for his views on investment trends.

“People picked his brain all the time,” Comes said. “He looked lost unless he had a phone attached to his ear.”

Geoffrey Hunter Bobroff was born on April 30, 1944, in Macomb, Illinois, and grew up in Florida, his wife said. His father, Nathan Bobroff, was an attorney and a law school professor. His mother, the former Sylvia Nina Levin, was a housewife who died when Bobroff was young.

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In 1966, Bobroff graduated from the University of Miami, where he studied accounting, and where he received a law degree three years later.

Bobroff followed sporting events and financial news on the nine televisions at home, Comes said. He was quoted explaining the concept of insider information in Christopher Frankie’s 2013 book “Nailed!” about the rise and fall of baseball star Lenny Dykstra.

For relaxation Bobroff assembled jigsaw puzzles with thousands of pieces, his wife said.

“He had a sorting system that was baffling,” she said.

His survivors include his wife and children, Rachel Bobroff of Dallas and Zachary Bobroff of Atlanta and Lucas Bobroff of Ellington, Connecticut.

To contact the reporter on this story: Stephen Miller in New York at smiller244@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Charles W. Stevens at cstevens@bloomberg.net Steven Gittelson

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