Seattle's Hippest Old Neighborhood

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<em>Before the Great Fire of 1889, Seattle’s Pioneer Square was filled with brothels, saloons, and gambling houses. The following year, architect Elmer H. Fisher began rebuilding the area, establishing it as the city’s first downtown. Today, after years of neglect, the plaza has been transformed into a thriving hub for locavore cuisine and one-of-a-kind boutiques, with more openings planned through 2015.</em>Altstadt Bierhalle &amp; BrathausSausage—pork, veal, beef, and duck—is the main event at this cavernous German beer hall, where the wurst is accompanied by <em>pommes frites</em>, sauerkraut, and sweet mustard. This is the second venture from James Beard Award–nominated chef Brendan McGill, whose Bain­bridge Island restaurant, Hitch­cock, is widely acclaimed. Or just stop in for a drink—the 29-­strong selection of mostly German beers includes the hoppy and surprisingly floral Veltins Grevensteiner and the smoky Freigeist Abraxas <em>(209 First Ave. S.; 206­-602-­6442; entrées from $12)</em>.More From :<ul> <li></li> <li></li> <li></li> <li></li> </ul>

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Before the Great Fire of 1889, Seattle’s Pioneer Square was filled with brothels, saloons, and gambling houses. The following year, architect Elmer H. Fisher began rebuilding the area, establishing it as the city’s first downtown. Today, after years of neglect, the plaza has been transformed into a thriving hub for locavore cuisine and one-of-a-kind boutiques, with more openings planned through 2015.Altstadt Bierhalle & BrathausSausage—pork, veal, beef, and duck—is the main event at this cavernous German beer hall, where the wurst is accompanied by pommes frites, sauerkraut, and sweet mustard. This is the second venture from James Beard Award–nominated chef Brendan McGill, whose Bain­bridge Island restaurant, Hitch­cock, is widely acclaimed. Or just stop in for a drink—the 29-­strong selection of mostly German beers includes the hoppy and surprisingly floral Veltins Grevensteiner and the smoky Freigeist Abraxas (209 First Ave. S.; 206­-602-­6442; entrées from $12).More From :

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<em>Before the Great Fire of 1889, Seattle’s Pioneer Square was filled with brothels, saloons, and gambling houses.... Read More

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Ask any Seattleite when Pioneer Square reappeared on the map and they’ll say March 2013, when James Beard Award–winning chef Matt Dillon opened Bar Sajor. Dillon, whose mini­-empire also includes Sitka & Spruce in lower Capitol Hill and the Corson Building in Georgetown, not only revitalized the neighborhood but created one of Seattle’s most exciting restaurants, working out of a kitchen without a range. Everything from the Dungeness crab gratin to the rib eye for two is cooked in a wood­fired oven with a rotisserie and a grill. “I wanted us to be really limited in what we’re doing here,” Dillon says. His appreciation of simple, old­-fashioned cooking comes through in many house­made items (cured sardines, smoked yogurt) and pickled veggies (sun­ chokes, turnips, radishes), which are sometimes sourced from his farm on nearby Vashon Island (323 Occidental Ave. S.; 206­-682­-1117; entrées from $14)More From :

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Ask any Seattleite when Pioneer Square reappeared on the map and they’ll say March 2013, when James Beard... Read More

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House­made perfumes, Imogene & Willie jeans, delicacies (coco­nut jam), and old-­fashioned can­dies (black licorice) line the brick walls of this inviting boutique run by mother­-and­-daughter duo Kate and Jessie Poole. After browsing, head to the rear of the shop and the tiny speakeasy­ style bar managed by Jessie’s sister, Sara. The cocktail list has classics like dirty martinis as well as more creative concoc­tions made with horehound­ infused bourbon, fir­-tip vodka, and Byrrh—many of which feature bitters mixed in­house (208 First Ave. S.; 206­-641­-7250).More From :

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House­made perfumes, Imogene &amp; Willie jeans, delicacies (coco­nut jam), and old-­fashioned can­dies (black... Read More

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Show up “late” (around 1:30 p.m.) if you don’t want to wait for a seat at this lunch­-only pasta spot. Chef-­owner Mike Easton moved his wildly popular Il Corvo from Pike Place Market to bigger digs in Pioneer Square in early 2013, and loyal fans of his pappardelle followed. The menu changes daily, but the pasta is always handmade (gigli with pistachio pesto; cavatelli with corn, sage, and cream), and the lasagna Bolognese is easily one of the best in town(217 James St.; 206­-538­-0999; entrées from $9).More From :

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Show up “late” (around 1:30 p.m.) if you don’t want to wait for a seat at this lunch­-only pasta spot. Chef-­owner... Read More

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A collaboration between Matt Dillon and Katherine Anderson, the proprietor of the Capitol Hill flower shop Marigold and Mint, this light­flooded café/boutique is a great stop for spices and oils sold by the pound, Libeco tea towels from Belgium, and gorgeously packaged soaps and lotions. The food, which Dillon describes as “really urban, for people on the go,” includes seasonal salads with ingredients sourced from Dillon’s farm. You can study flower­-arranging with Anderson (wine and snacks included) or cooking with Dillon (300 Occidental Ave. S.; 206­-624­-1374; cooking and flower­ arranging classes from $125).More From :

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A collaboration between Matt Dillon and Katherine Anderson, the proprietor of the Capitol Hill flower shop Marigold... Read More

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Russell Flint, an alum of the Interbay neighborhood’s popular brasserie Boat Street Café, opened his second butcher shop in Pioneer Square last year. Along with the excellent house char­cuterie and unique cuts (like pork tri­tip), there’s also a lunch menu of sandwiches (don’t miss the roasted pork shoulder on sour­ dough bread) and sophisticated small plates like steak tartare (404 Occidental Ave. S.; 206-­467­-4854; sandwiches from $10).More From :

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Russell Flint, an alum of the Interbay neighborhood’s popular brasserie Boat Street Café, opened his second butcher... Read More

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