U.S. Will Play Belgium as Germany Faces Algeria in World Cup

June 16 (Bloomberg) –- At the World Cup, some of the most spectacular soccer moves are on full display. From a Side Volley to the Maradona and the Snake, Bloomberg asked a professional player from the New York Red Bulls to show us how they're done. Video by: Sadie Bass, Brandon Lisy, David Yim. (Source: Bloomberg)

The U.S. will play Belgium for a place in the quarterfinals of soccer’s World Cup, a day after Germany takes on Algeria in the round of 16.

Algeria completed the lineup for the knockout phase yesterday with a 1-1 draw against Russia that took the African country beyond the group stage for the first time in four attempts. Belgium, playing with 10 men, beat South Korea 1-0.

In yesterday’s early games, Germany beat the U.S. 1-0, a result that sent both teams into the next round at the expense of Ghana and Portugal. Germany won Group G and the U.S. finished in second place on goal difference ahead of Portugal, which defeated Ghana 2-1 on a late goal by Cristiano Ronaldo.

More on the 2014 World Cup:

“It’s huge for us getting out of this group,” U.S. coach Juergen Klinsmann said in a televised interview. “Everybody said, ‘You have no chance.’ We took that chance and we move on and now we really want to prove a point.”

The U.S. will play Belgium on July 1 in Salvador and Algeria will take on Germany in Porto Alegre on June 30.

There are no matches today. The Round of 16 starts tomorrow when Brazil meets Chile in Belo Horizonte and Colombia plays Uruguay -- which will be missing forward Luis Suarez because of a ban for biting -- in Rio de Janeiro.

Photographer: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

Jermaine Jones of USA batles for the ball with Mats Hummels of Germany during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil group G match between the United States and Germany at Arena Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, on June 26, 2014. Close

Jermaine Jones of USA batles for the ball with Mats Hummels of Germany during the 2014... Read More

Close
Open
Photographer: Laurence Griffiths/Getty Images

Jermaine Jones of USA batles for the ball with Mats Hummels of Germany during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil group G match between the United States and Germany at Arena Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, on June 26, 2014.

Alexander Kokorin’s headed goal gave Russia the lead after six minutes in Curitiba, Brazil, and Algeria tied it in the 60th minute, also with a header. A green laser light darted across the face and torso of Russian goalkeeper Igor Akinfeev before Algeria took the free kick on which Islam Slimani scored.

Red Card

Interactive Graphic: Bloomberg Visual Data

Interactive Graphic: Bloomberg Visual Data

“In my career, I’ve never seen a World Cup at this level,” Russia coach Fabio Capello said. “The quality is absolutely incredible, the pace is so intense. If you make the slightest mistake, you pay for it.”

Belgium, whose midfielder Steven Defour was shown a red card just before halftime for stomping on Kim Shin-wook, beat South Korea on a 78th-minute goal by Jan Vertonghen.

With Nigeria qualifying from Group F, Africa has two countries in the second round for the first time in tournament history.

“We played a heroic match and we deserved to qualify,” Algerian coach Vahid Halilhodzic said. “We’ve received support from all over the Arabic world -– and that has been wonderful. The people here in Brazil also appreciate our sincerity and enthusiasm, and I’m proud of that.”

Germany defeated the U.S. on Thomas Mueller’s goal 10 minutes into the second half in rain-soaked Recife on Brazil’s east coast. It was the striker’s fourth goal at the tournament.

Photographer: Lars Baron/FIFA via Getty Images

Head coaches Jurgen Klinsmann of the United States and Joachim Loew of Germany after the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group G match between USA and Germany at Arena Pernambuco on June 26, 2014. Close

Head coaches Jurgen Klinsmann of the United States and Joachim Loew of Germany after... Read More

Close
Open
Photographer: Lars Baron/FIFA via Getty Images

Head coaches Jurgen Klinsmann of the United States and Joachim Loew of Germany after the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Group G match between USA and Germany at Arena Pernambuco on June 26, 2014.

Portugal went ahead when Ghana defender John Boye knocked the ball into his own goal in the 31st minute in Brasilia. Asamoah Gyan tied it in the 55th minute to become the top-scoring African in World Cup history and World Player of the Year Ronaldo got the winner from close range in the 80th minute.

The U.S. is in the round of 16 at consecutive editions of the World Cup for the first time. The Americans have a 38 percent chance of advancing to the quarterfinals, according to projections by Bloomberg Sports.

Suarez Banned

“We have seen the first half of the U.S. game,” Belgium’s Kevin Mirallas said. “It’s a very compact team. It doesn’t give space to the opponents.”

Also yesterday, Suarez was banned for four months and suspended for Uruguay’s next nine international matches by the sport’s governing body for biting Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini during a 1-0 win on June 24 that eliminated the European team.

The 27-year-old striker will miss the rest of the World Cup, including Uruguay’s match tomorrow against Colombia. He also will sit out 20 games for his club, Liverpool, the second year in a row that a suspension has caused him to miss the start of the English Premier League season for biting.

Uruguay said it will appeal the suspension, though Suarez won’t be permitted to play against Colombia even during an appeal, FIFA said during a news conference in Rio de Janeiro. During the four-month ban Suarez is prohibited from entering any soccer stadium.

To contact the reporters on this story: Christopher Elser in Rio de Janeiro at celser@bloomberg.net; Dex McLuskey in Dallas at dmcluskey@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Christopher Elser at celser@bloomberg.net Rob Gloster

Bloomberg reserves the right to remove comments but is under no obligation to do so, or to explain individual moderation decisions.

Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus.