Bharara’s Criminal Chief Reisner Departs After Two Years

Lorin Reisner, who has led Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara’s criminal investigations for the past two years, is stepping down next month.

He will be succeeded by Bharara’s chief counsel, Joon Kim, according to Jim Margolin, a spokesman for the office. Daniel Stein, a partner at Richards Kibbe & Orbe LLP, will replace Kim, Margolin said. Reisner hasn’t announced future plans.

As the criminal chief for the Southern District of New York, Reisner has supervised investigations ranging from securities fraud and public corruption to organized crime and narcotics. The office has prosecuted dozens of high-profile insider trading cases in recent years and is leading negotiations with BNP Paribas (BNP) SA in what could become the biggest settlement ever for violating U.S. economic sanctions.

Before joining Bharara’s office, Reisner served as deputy director of enforcement at the Securities and Exchange Commission, where he managed some of the agency’s highest-profile cases to come from the 2008 financial crisis.

Reisner, 52, led a landmark case against Goldman Sachs Group Inc., claiming that the bank misled investors about a financial product known as Abacus that was linked to subprime mortgages. That case included claims against former bank executive Fabrice Tourre, who contested the SEC’s case and later lost at trial.

Reisner, who holds degrees from Harvard Law School and Brandeis University, started his career as a law clerk for U.S. District Judge Milton Pollack. This is the second time he’s leaving the Manhattan U.S. Attorney’s office, where he worked as a prosecutor from 1990 to 1994. Before joining the SEC in 2009, Reisner was a partner at law firm Debevoise & Plimpton LLP.

To contact the reporter on this story: Keri Geiger in New York at kgeiger4@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Sara Forden at sforden@bloomberg.net David Scheer

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