Hong Kong-Macau Ferry Crash Into Breakwater Hurts 70 People

Source: Imaginechina via AP Images

A passenger, who was injured as a high-speed ferry crashed into a breakwater, is escorted by a rescuer after arriving at a port in Macau. Close

A passenger, who was injured as a high-speed ferry crashed into a breakwater, is... Read More

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Source: Imaginechina via AP Images

A passenger, who was injured as a high-speed ferry crashed into a breakwater, is escorted by a rescuer after arriving at a port in Macau.

A high-speed ferry en route to Macau from Hong Kong hit a breakwater this morning, injuring 70 people, Macau’s Marine and Water Bureau said.

The crash happened approximately 9:35 a.m., about an hour after the TurboJET Cacilhas departed Hong Kong carrying 220 passengers and 13 crew, according to an e-mailed statement from Shun Tak Holdings Ltd., which operates the 24-hour ferry service. Of those injured, only one was still in the hospital for treatment as of 5 p.m., the company said.

Hong Kong’s marine safety has come under scrutiny after a collision between two vessels in July 2012 killed 39 people in the most deadly incident since 1971. Visitors from China and Hong Kong to Macau, the only place in the nation where casinos are legal, accounted for 88 percent of the total in the first quarter, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

All TurboJET vessels undergo annual inspections, and the Cacilhas will have its check in July, Shun Tak said in the statement. The vessels operated by the company are propelled by waterjets powered by gas or diesel engines.

Shun Tak-China Travel Ship Management is owned by Hong Kong-listed Shun Tak Holdings Ltd. (242) and China Travel International Investment Hong Kong Ltd, according to the company’s website.

All ferry sailings have resumed normal services, the company said.

The Macau marine authority is investigating the accident, according to the statement.

To contact the reporter on this story: Janet Ong in Hong Kong at jong3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Tan Hwee Ann at hatan@bloomberg.net Greg Ahlstrand

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