U.S. Tennis to Build 100-Court Facility for National Development

The U.S. Tennis Association said it’s planning to build a new 100-plus court facility in Florida that will serve as the sport’s new national home.

The USTA’s Player Development Division in Boca Raton, Florida, and its Community Development Division in White Plains, New York, will move to the 63-acre facility in Lake Nona, Orlando, the USTA said in a news release.

“Our goal is simple: to continue to raise the bar for our sport,” Gordon Smith, the USTA’s executive director and chief operating officer, said in a statement. “Our new facility in Orlando will help ensure we develop the next generation of players, coaches, tennis providers, officials and volunteers.”

No American man has won a Grand Slam tournament since Andy Roddick captured the U.S. Open in 2003. The highest-ranked American on the ATP World Tour is John Isner at No. 11. Sam Querrey is the next-highest ranked American, at 66th. U.S. women fare better in the WTA Tour rankings, with French and U.S. Open champion Serena Williams ranked No. 1. Six others are in the top 50: Sloane Stephens (16), Venus Williams (32), Jamie Hampton (35), Alison Riske (44), Madison Keys (47), and Varvara Lepchenko (49).

The Orlando center is targeted for completion during the fourth quarter of 2016. It will have hard and clay courts, a dedicated Team USA area, a section that will serve as the home of the University of Central Florida’s men’s and women’s tennis teams, and smaller-sized courts for youth development.

The center also will include dorms that can house 32 people, a pro shop, a player lounge and a fitness area. The college tennis area will have seating for 1,200 spectators.

To contact the reporter on this story: Mason Levinson in New York at mlevinson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net Dex McLuskey

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