Christie’s Lawyers Release Memos From Interviews on Bridge Probe

Photographer: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The George Washington Bridge connects Fort Lee, New Jersey with New York City. Close

The George Washington Bridge connects Fort Lee, New Jersey with New York City.

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Photographer: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

The George Washington Bridge connects Fort Lee, New Jersey with New York City.

Lawyers for New Jersey Governor Chris Christie released 75 memos today summarizing witness interviews from their internal review of deliberate traffic jams last year at the George Washington Bridge.

The material, from the law firm of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, also was provided to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Newark and the state legislature’s Select Committee on Investigation. Each is reviewing the tie-ups in Fort Lee, in the approach lanes to the bridge to Manhattan, from Sept. 9 to 12.

Christie’s office hired Gibson Dunn to examine the matter. Its report, issued March 26, concluded that Christie, a 51-year-old Republican and potential 2016 presidential candidate, had no advance knowledge of a plan to cause delays. It placed the blame on Bridget Anne Kelly, a onetime Christie deputy chief of staff, and David Wildstein, a former director of interstate capital projects for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which operates the bridge. Kelly had e-mailed Wildstein to suggest “traffic problems in Fort Lee,” to which Wildstein replied: “Got it.”

Fort Lee Mayor Mark Sokolich, a Democrat, has said he believed the jams may have been related to his refusal to endorse Christie for a second term in the November election. Kelly and Wildstein weren’t among those interviewed by Gibson Dunn, and the law firm said it couldn’t determine a motive for the jams.

To contact the reporter on this story: Elise Young in Trenton at eyoung30@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story: Stephen Merelman at smerelman@bloomberg.net Alan Goldstein, Justin Blum

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